trochanter

(redirected from Trochanters)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Trochanters: Trochanteric fossa

tro·chan·ter

 (trō-kăn′tər)
n.
1. Any of several bony processes on the upper part of the femur of many vertebrates.
2. The second proximal segment of the leg of an insect.

[New Latin, from Greek trokhantēr, ball of the hip joint, from trekhein, to run.]

tro·chan′ter·al, tro′chan·ter′ic (trō′kən-tĕr′ĭk, -kăn-) adj.

trochanter

(trəʊˈkæntə)
n
1. (Anatomy) any of several processes on the upper part of the vertebrate femur, to which muscles are attached
2. (Zoology) the third segment of an insect's leg
[C17: via French from Greek trokhantēr, from trekhein to run]

tro•chan•ter

(troʊˈkæn tər)

n.
1. (in humans) either of two knobs at the top of the femur that serve for the attachment of muscles between the thigh and pelvis.
2. (in other vertebrates) any of two or more similar knobs at the top of the femur.
3. the second segment of an insect leg, between the coxa and femur.
[1605–15; < New Latin < Greek trochantḗr; akin to trochós wheel]
tro`chan•ter′ic (-kənˈtɛr ɪk) tro•chan′ter•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trochanter - one of the bony prominences developed near the upper extremity of the femur to which muscles are attachedtrochanter - one of the bony prominences developed near the upper extremity of the femur to which muscles are attached
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
femoris, femur, thighbone - the longest and thickest bone of the human skeleton; extends from the pelvis to the knee
Translations

tro·chan·ter

n. trocánter, una de las dos prominencias exteriores localizadas bajo el cuello del fémur;
greater ______ mayor;
lesser ______ menor.

trochanter

n trocánter m
References in periodicals archive ?
After examining specimens of the genera Nhandu Lucas, 1983, Proshapalopus Mello-Leitao, 1923, Pterinopelma and Vitalius Lucas, Silva & Bertani, 1993, a conspicuous tuft of setae on the trochanters and coxae drew our attention.
Inclusion Criteria: Criteria for inclusion required mobility with no or one walking aid, presenting with basicervical fracture or its equivalent; a basicervical fracture, defined as an extracapsular fracture, through the base of the femoral neck at its junction with the intertrochanteric region [3], corresponding to the AO type B2.1 [18]; and simulators of the basicervical fracture, defined as a trochanteric fracture in which the head-neck fragment does not remain connected to the trochanters and its inferior cortical extension is not long enough to hinder its rotational movement.
In "area classification," the proximal femur was divided into 4 areas with 3 boundary lines; Line-1 is the center of the neck, Line-2 is the border between the neck and the trochanteric zone, and Line-3 is the line that links the inferior borders of the greater and lesser trochanters (Figure 1).
The top of the femur shaft has two eminences (bumps): the great and lesser trochanters, where many muscle tendons attach.
Legs mainly black and yellow; all coxae black with yellowish apices; trochanters yellow; all femora black, with yellow apices; tibiae black, about distal third of fore tibia and apex of hind tibia yellow; fore tarsomeres yellowish but their dorsal surface darkened; mid and hind tarsi yellow but dorsal surface of last 2 tarsomeres darkened.
Legs brown, except fore coxae and trochanters, ventral surface of fore femur, fore tibia, middle and hind trochanters pale.
Leg I with yellow coxae, trochanters pale brown with yellow band ventrally, remaining segments pale brown; leg II yellow throughout, with dark bands on lateral sides of femora; legs III and IV with coxae, trochanters, femora and patellae all yellow proximally and dark brown distally, tibiae yellow with dark brown medial and distal bands, metatarsi yellow with dark spot located distally on the ventral side, and tarsi yellow.
The difference between the left and right trochanters was significantly related to the estimated total hours spent carrying a cell phone.
This may be achieved either by screws passed across the femur between the trochanters in the lateral to medial direction, or by screws into the femoral head and neck.
The sacrum and greater trochanters have minimal soft tissue covering and have an inherent high compressive stiffness; these are two of the most common sites for pressure necrosis.
Optimal visualization in the anteroposterior (AP) view requires that all parts of the pelvis, as well as the femoral head, neck, trochanters and proximal third or fourth of the shaft, be included on the film.