trophic level

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trophic level

n.
The position of a species or a group of species within a food chain or food web.

troph′ic lev`el


n.
Ecol. each of the levels of feeding that together form a food chain.
[1940–45]
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The following terms were combined: submerged macrophytes or macrophytes or aquatic plants and phytoplankton or plankton or planktonic community or phytoplankton and zooplankton and trophic levels or throfic interactions or throphic web.
The IMTA system achieves sustainable aquaculture development by recycling aquaculture wastes such as food resources through co-cultivating the targeted species with others having different feeding habits at different trophic levels (Chopin et al., 2013; Neori et al., 2017).
As micro bats are insectivorous and they are present at higher trophic levels, so they would prove to be best indicators and can reflect the relationship between environmental disturbance and trophic levels in a better way, because bio accumulation and metabolic capacity of diet increases in animals as positions increases in the food chain (Alleva et al., 2006).
According to data on recent marine organisms, the higher Sr/Ca values, close to those of sea water, are characteristic of lower trophic levels (Peek & Clementz 2012).
Thus, detritivore fishes play an important role in energy flux and material cycling in these food webs, supporting diversity and biomass of higher trophic levels. The fact that detritivores occupy higher TPs than expected for primary consumers, results in relatively long food chains.
Zooplankton plays an essential role in the transfer of matter and energy from phytoplankton to other trophic levels [13].
A true understanding of the health threats of pollution that bioaccumulates and biomagnifies, such as mercury, needs to include data from several trophic levels, beginning with water systems and their security [21, 22].
The various forms of Se are known to be transferred between trophic levels from plants to insect herbivores and on to insect predators, although the bioavailability of each form at each trophic level is not fully understood.
After introductions to the kingdom and its ecosystems, the reports cover how Cerro Azul made use of trophic levels two, three, and four; the use of plants at Cerro Azul; the domestic animals, their skeletal remains, and their byproducts; and the interface of ecology and economy.
Elton (1927) argued that the general constraint on food chain length may be largely related to the loss of energy in successive trophic levels due to low conversion efficiency in consumer species.