tropicbird

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trop·ic·bird

 (trŏp′ĭk-bûrd′)
n.
Any of several predominantly white, swift-flying seabirds of the genus Phaethon of warm regions, having a pair of very long central tail feathers.

tropicbird

(ˈtrɒpɪkˌbɜːd)
n
(Animals) any aquatic bird of the tropical family Phaethontidae, having long slender tail feathers and a white plumage with black markings: order Pelecaniformes (pelicans, cormorants, etc)
[C17: so called because it is found in the tropical regions]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tropicbird - mostly white web-footed tropical seabird often found far from landtropicbird - mostly white web-footed tropical seabird often found far from land
pelecaniform seabird - large fish-eating seabird with four-toed webbed feet
genus Phaethon, Phaethon - type genus of the Phaethontidae
Translations
paille-en-cul
References in periodicals archive ?
Pelecaniformes (pelicans, tropicbirds, cormorants, frigatebirds, anhingas, gannets).
You're likely to see flamingos and green sea turtles, flightless cormorants, bright marine iguanas, Espanola lava lizards, hood mockingbirds, swallow-tailed gulls, blue-footed boobies, Nazca boobies, redbilled tropicbirds, Galapagos hawks, Darwin's finches, waved albatross and even penguins, dolphins, shark and whales.
Observant birders traveling by boat may see seafaring terns, shearwaters, tropicbirds, and gannets en route.
No one who gazes upon the granite cliffs where tropicbirds soar can fail to sense the timeless lineage.
With the Oceanic Society, we'll survey the nesting patterns of Laysan albatross, tropicbirds, and brown noddies on this avian adventure.
Native naupaka shrubs, which provide the best habitat for albatrosses as well as red-tailed tropicbirds, are being restored.
Undoubtedly, the most typical are the tropicbirds (Phaethon), which resemble white gulls but with black stripes and the tail prolonged into an elongated central feather.
and hidden valleys to which the tropicbirds descended
The most critical nesting areas, including those for the colonies of red-footed boobies and tropicbirds on the opposite point, are on lands owned by two large private development companies.
With Oceanic Society researchers, we'll survey the nesting patterns of Laysan albatross, tropicbirds, and brown noddies on this avian adventure.