troubadour

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trou·ba·dour

 (tro͞o′bə-dôr′, -do͝or′)
n.
1. One of a class of 12th-century and 13th-century lyric poets in southern France, northern Italy, and northern Spain, who composed songs in langue d'oc often about courtly love.
2. A strolling minstrel.

[French, from Provençal trobador, from Old Provençal, from trobar, to compose, probably from Vulgar Latin *tropāre, from Late Latin tropus, trope, song, from Latin, trope; see trope.]

troubadour

(ˈtruːbəˌdʊə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) any of a class of lyric poets who flourished principally in Provence and N Italy from the 11th to the 13th centuries, writing chiefly on courtly love in complex metric form
2. (Music, other) a singer
[C18: from French, from Old Provençal trobador, from trobar to write verses, perhaps ultimately from Latin tropus trope]

trou•ba•dour

(ˈtru bəˌdɔr, -ˌdoʊr, -ˌdʊər)

n.
1. one of a class of lyric poets who lived principally in S France from the 11th to 13th centuries and wrote songs and poems in langue d'oc, chiefly on themes of courtly love. Compare trouvère.
2. any wandering singer or minstrel.
[1720–30; < French < Occitan trobador <trob(ar) to find, compose]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.troubadour - a singer of folk songstroubadour - a singer of folk songs    
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings

troubadour

noun minstrel, singer, poet, balladeer, lyric poet, jongleur melodies like a medieval troubadour's laments
Translations

troubadour

[ˈtruːbədɔːʳ] Ntrovador m

troubadour

nTroubadour m
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bandits | At the beginning of the 21st century, The Bandits were gearing up for an exceptional couple of years, refining their jangly, troubadour style for Merseyside audiences.
Jumping down into the crowd with his guitar over his back and in finest troubadour style, McClure led us all down the stairs and across Sauchiehall Street to a back alley for what was a real moment.