troubadour

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trou·ba·dour

 (tro͞o′bə-dôr′, -do͝or′)
n.
1. One of a class of 12th-century and 13th-century lyric poets in southern France, northern Italy, and northern Spain, who composed songs in langue d'oc often about courtly love.
2. A strolling minstrel.

[French, from Provençal trobador, from Old Provençal, from trobar, to compose, probably from Vulgar Latin *tropāre, from Late Latin tropus, trope, song, from Latin, trope; see trope.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

troubadour

(ˈtruːbəˌdʊə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) any of a class of lyric poets who flourished principally in Provence and N Italy from the 11th to the 13th centuries, writing chiefly on courtly love in complex metric form
2. (Music, other) a singer
[C18: from French, from Old Provençal trobador, from trobar to write verses, perhaps ultimately from Latin tropus trope]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

trou•ba•dour

(ˈtru bəˌdɔr, -ˌdoʊr, -ˌdʊər)

n.
1. one of a class of lyric poets who lived principally in S France from the 11th to 13th centuries and wrote songs and poems in langue d'oc, chiefly on themes of courtly love. Compare trouvère.
2. any wandering singer or minstrel.
[1720–30; < French < Occitan trobador <trob(ar) to find, compose]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.troubadour - a singer of folk songstroubadour - a singer of folk songs    
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

troubadour

noun minstrel, singer, poet, balladeer, lyric poet, jongleur melodies like a medieval troubadour's laments
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

troubadour

[ˈtruːbədɔːʳ] Ntrovador m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

troubadour

nTroubadour m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Presented in a 21st century version of troubadour style, Earl Fischer, a dedicated peace activist and performer, will use singing, poetry and group discussion to explain "What the World Needs Now" from 7 to 9 p.m.
Jacquand was a pupil of Fleury Francois Richard, the artist trained in the studio of Jacques-Louis David who is credited with launching the troubadour style with his Valentine of Milan Mourning her Husband, Louis of Orleans, exhibited at the Salon in 1802.