vocal folds

(redirected from True vocal cords)
Also found in: Medical.

vocal folds

pl n
(Anatomy) See vocal cords

vo′cal cords`



n.pl.
either of two pairs of folds of mucous membrane stretched across the larynx, the lower pair of which produces sound or voice as it is made to vibrate by the passage of air from the lungs.
References in periodicals archive ?
True vocal cords were found to be the most common site to be involved (86%) with right cord (26%) involvement being more common than the left (20%) [Table 7].
True vocal cords are most frequently affected in laryngeal TB followed by the epiglottis, false cords and ventricles, arytenoids, posterior commissure and subglottic area.
A specialized ETT was accurately placed such that the surface electrode was in contact with the true vocal cords, and the integrity of the NM system was confirmed by tapping test.
The evaluation was based only on microlaryngoscopic outer appearance of the true vocal cords in this question.
Flexible laryngoscopy was performed in the office, revealing irregular thickening at the petiole of the epiglottis with bilateral false vocal cord fullness and granulation changes noted at the anterior aspects of both true vocal cords.
Fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed oedema and decreased mobility of the right true vocal cord, along with characteristic granulomatous roughness of true vocal cords bilaterally, raising suspicions of carcinoma of the larynx.
Vocal cords polyps are the commonest benign laryngeal lesions that arise from the true vocal cords.
The condition consists of paradoxical adduction of the true vocal cords on inspiration and occasionally on early expiration as well (1,2).
Supraglottis: The space above the upper surface of the true vocal cords to the laryngeal inlet is the Supraglottis, laryngeal inlet is a part of the supra glottis and is formed by:
Basement membrane is visible separating the surface epithelium from the underlying connective tissue of lamina propria (Fig-1) The epithelium lining the true vocal cords appear to be similar to the one lining the entire ventricular cavity.
The ventricles and the false and true vocal cords are the most common sites for localized amyloidosis in the respiratory tree.