trustor

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trustor

(ˈtrʌstə; trʌstˈɔː)
n
(in property law) a person who sets up a trust transferring property to another person
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.trustor - (law) a person who creates a trust by giving real or personal property in trust to a trustee for the benefit of a beneficiary; a person who gives such property is said to settle it on the trustee
bestower, conferrer, donor, giver, presenter - person who makes a gift of property
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations
fiduciant
References in periodicals archive ?
Because partners will achieve a greater profit if they behave in a trustworthy way, and the trustors will also thereby achieve a greater profit, this means that partners have no motivation to behave in an untrustworthy way.
An approximate trend emerged in the correlation of age regarding TV trust: the percentage of trustors increased from 39.
Accordingly, trustors and beneficiaries desiring a balance among the competing interests of removing property from the transfer tax system and the free alienability of property have turned to modern trust laws to achieve their goals.
State laws in Nevada are very favorable for trustors, to the point that trusts there now hold $18 billion in assets, up from $8 billion in 2008.
1) Subjective: Different trustors may determine different trust values towards to the same trustee due to different interaction experiences.
All trustors who are related to each other shall be counted as one individual, and neither the number of trusts nor the number of beneficiaries of those trusts shall be counted.
Trustors see displays of trusting behaviors, also exemplified in Table 1, as an indication that the individual is trustworthy (Serva et al.
2001) allow trustees to reciprocate toward the other trustors, and find that indirect reciprocity induces only insignificantly smaller donations than direct reciprocity and that trustees are more rewarding in the case of indirect reciprocity.
As stated above, the trust concept involves two relationships which involve different trustors (the subject to trust) and trustees (the object to be trusted).
In Locke's scenario, governments are created simply to serve as trustees while the people are the true trustors as well as beneficiaries of this limited and fiduciary governmental power.
According to Coleman (1990), entrepreneurship is somehow a trust function in which trustors place resources in the hands of others who are expected to realize gains.
2008) has also shown that trustors suffer from betrayal aversion, for example, fear of misplacing trust.