truthiness


Also found in: Wikipedia.

truthiness

(ˈtruːθɪˌnəs)
n
informal (of a belief, etc) the quality of being considered to be true because of what the believer wishes or feels, regardless of the facts
References in periodicals archive ?
This really happened," we're told at the top, a guarantor of authenticity that may bring American Hustle and other exercises in cinematic truthiness to mind.
In the '80s, Ronald Reagan's presidency was famously a triumph of truthiness and entertainment.
Librarians should be able to connect information, ideas, disciplines, and people to counter the current world of "alternative facts" and truthiness.
Shifting effortlessly from the 19th century to the 21st, Young draws connections between words like swindler, diddling and confidence man and contemporary buzzwords like plagiarism, truthiness and fake news.
This reality challenges the quality of blog-based arguments resulting in readers having to face the risk of being driven into a matrix of information where propaganda, truth, truthiness and lies are all mixed up together.
Despite, for example, John Rosegrant's eloquent equivocation with the word "enchantment" (131-132), Tolkien's iteration of the fantasy frame does not encourage or even allow conflict between the truthiness (as it were) of the frame and the themes of decay and loss that the story communicates.
We learned to be the architects of our own learning and not passive receptors of information--a lesson that needs to be constantly re-learned, especially in the age of echo chambers and truthiness.
Other words under consideration for word of the year include science, integrity, socialism, bailout, truthiness and the slang interjection "w00t," in a nod to the nation's obsession with political issues this year and, apparently, expressing joy by using numbers as letters.
She defines truthiness as the sense that if something feels right, it is true - no matter what the facts say.
The changing faces of journalism: Tabloidization, technology and truthiness (pp.
Perhaps the authors' choice of this descriptor, suggesting the faux precision of a linear spectrum, was an effort to conjure truthiness in the minds of fellow political scientists, or potential publishers.
This question has opened the door for a new, more overt truthiness, espoused by the likes of Trump, who seems to introduce freshly invented "facts" on a daily basis.