tsar

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Related to Tsar': Russian Tsar

tsar

 (zär, tsär)
n.
Variant of czar.. See Usage Note at czar.

tsar

(zɑː; tsɑː) or

czar

n
1. (Historical Terms) (until 1917) the emperor of Russia
2. a tyrant; autocrat
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) informal a public official charged with responsibility for dealing with a certain problem or issue: a drugs tsar.
4. informal a person in authority; leader
5. (Historical Terms) (formerly) any of several S Slavonic rulers, such as any of the princes of Serbia in the 14th century
Also (less commonly): tzar
[from Russian tsar, via Gothic kaisar from Latin Caesar]
ˈtsardom, ˈczardom n

czar

or tsar

(zɑr, tsɑr)

n.
1. an emperor or king.
2. (often cap.) the former emperor of Russia.
3. an autocratic ruler or leader.
4. any person exercising great authority or power: a czar of industry.
[1545–55; < Russian tsar', Old Russian tsĭsarĭ emperor, king (akin to Old Church Slavonic tsěsarĭ) < Gothic kaisar emperor (< Greek or Latin); Greek kaîsar < Latin Caesar Caesar]
czar′dom, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tsar - a male monarch or emperor (especially of Russia prior to 1917)tsar - a male monarch or emperor (especially of Russia prior to 1917)
Russia - a former empire in eastern Europe and northern Asia created in the 14th century with Moscow as the capital; powerful in the 17th and 18th centuries under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great when Saint Petersburg was the capital; overthrown by revolution in 1917
crowned head, monarch, sovereign - a nation's ruler or head of state usually by hereditary right

tsar

czar
noun
1. ruler, leader, emperor, sovereign, tyrant, despot, overlord, autocrat Princess Anne is related to the Tsar of Russia.
2. (Informal) head, chief, boss, big cheese (informal), baas (S. African), head honcho (informal) He was appointed 'drugs tsar' by Bill Clinton.
Translations
car
zar
cár
tsar, keisari
caras
cars
cár

tsar

[zɑːʳ] Nzar m

tsar

tzar, czar [ˈzɑːr] n
(formerly, in Russia)tsar m
(person in charge of dealing with problem) drug tsar → haut(e) responsable mf de la lutte contre la drogue
AIDS tsar → haut(e) responsable mf de la lutte contre le sida

tsar

nZar m

tsar

[zɑːʳ] nzar m inv

tsar,

czar,

tzar

(zaː) noun
(the status of) any of the former emperors of Russia. He was crowned tsar; Tsar Nicholas.
References in classic literature ?
Every trait and every movement of the Tsar's seemed to him enchanting.
The Tsar's foot, in the narrow pointed boot then fashionable, touched the groin of the bobtailed bay mare he rode, his hand in a white glove gathered up the reins, and he moved off accompanied by an irregularly swaying sea of aides-de-camp.
9) For the present reviewer's views on this issue, see Morin Perri [Maureen Perrie], "Izbrannyi tsar' i prirozhdennye gosudari: Mikhail Romanov i ego soperniki," in Gosudarstva i obshchestvo v Rossii XV--nachala XX veka: Sbornik statei pamiati Nikolaia Evgen 'evicha Nosova, ed.
ORANGE Order chiefs have issued a harsh message to Jack McConnell over his plans to create a new 'parades tsar'.
Moreover, with mayor Steve Rotheram's cabinet being as overwhelmingly male as mayor Street's, a 'fairness tsar' could hardly NOT be female, and indeed is: TUC Regional Secretary Lynn Collins.
For instance, the Soviet historian Pavel Ryndzuskii argues that assertions of peasant monarchism "were, as a rule, based on a most literal reading of the regular forms of address used by 'subjects' in their petitions to the authorities, including petitions brought 'to the tsar' [na vysochaishee imia], formulaic expressions of supplication employed to increase the effectiveness of one's petition or prescribed by official regulations on presenting petitions.
Firstly, when the Government appoints someone to a special position, why are they always described as 'a tsar' - like Kirkburton's own Keith Hellawell who was 'drugs tsar' a decade ago?
John Murray will publish 'The King, The Kaiser and The Tsar' by Catrine Clay in 2006, with Viking releasing 'The Three Emperors' by Miranda Carter in 2007.
Another, academic critic was Anna Pankratova who objected to the idealized representation of 'a people's tsar' in Part One evoked by the procession of Muscovites begging him to return to the capital.
Tsar' i Bog: Iazykovye aspekty sakralizatsii monarkha v Rossii (v pechati).
At the close of the 19th century, when the notion of a national tsar free from institutional constraints was in the ascendant, the committees also became convenient sites for the machinations of the tsar's personal agents.
In the Royal Family, George V and Tsar Nicholas were first cousins by marriage so George VI and the Tsar's daughter Anastasia were second cousins.