Tubular bridge


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Related to Tubular bridge: cantilever bridge, covered bridge
a bridge in the form of a hollow trunk or rectangular tube, with cellular walls made of iron plates riveted together, as the Britannia bridge over the Menai Strait, and the Victoria bridge at Montreal.
a bridge in the form of a hollow trunk or tube, made of iron plates riveted together, as the Victoria bridge over the St. Lawrence, at Montreal, Canada, and the Britannia bridge over the Menai Straits.

See also: Bridge, Tubular

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References in periodicals archive ?
1850: The Menai tubular bridge, joining Wales and Anglesey, constructed by Robert Stephenson, was opened.
Carved into black basalt cliffs, it was deemed an engineering triumph, connected by a network of walkways and bridges - the most iconic of which was the tubular bridge.
Among other things, nearly 40 metric tons of Indian iron were used in the construction of London Bridge in 1824-31, and preference was given to Indian iron in the construction of the tubular bridge across the Menai Strait in Britain, of the same period.
1850: The Menai tubular bridge, joining Anglesey to the Welsh mainland, constructed by Robert Stephenson, was opened.
1850: English engineer Robert Stephenson's tubular bridge was opened, linking Anglesey to mainland Wales.
Accommodation is divided in two, with the main research and patient facilities separated from a large auditorium to the east; the two opaque white masses are joined at high level by a sparkling transparent tubular bridge.
Robert Stephenson's Britannia Bridge over the Strait was the second and longest tubular bridge when it opened in 1850, built to carry the railway line linking Chester to Holyhead.
The three sepia photographs of the building of the structurally revolutionary tubular bridge across the Menai Straits in north Wales date back to 1849.
1850: The Menai tubular bridge, joining mainland Wales with Anglesey, constructed by Robert Stephenson, was opened.
The colourful posters show scenes including Beaumaris' 13th-century castle, the Talyllyn railway, the Conwy Tubular Bridge and the Britannia Bridge.
They were using lighted newspaper to light up the inside of the tubular bridge.
Two of the lions at the entrance to the Britannia Tubular Bridge, around 1920.