tulipomania

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tulipomania

(ˌtjuːlɪpəˈmeɪnɪə)
n
(Horticulture) an extreme enthusiasm for growing and collecting tulips
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tulipomania

a mania for planting and growing tulips, especially such a mania in Holland in the 1630s, when a sum equivalent to $5200 was paid for a single bulb. — tulipomaniac, n.
See also: Flowers
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The Tulip Mania is considered another early example of a financial bubble.
Stan illustrated the greed section of his talk by visiting 17th century Holland when the Tulip mania grew and collapsed.
Don't miss the Tulip Mania exhibition at the Juliana Pavilion.
For most of the year, despite the weary pessimism -- that we see sprinkled throughout history from the decline of the Roman Empire to the Tulip mania and modern day financial crises -- the government has been working proactively towards liberalising markets to promote greater levels of economic efficiency and activity.
The best-known example he cites is the tulip mania that gripped the Netherlands in the early 17th century.
Since then, prices have fluctuated wildly, earning bitcoin comparison with the tulip mania of the Netherlands in the 17th century.
History of Greed: Financial Fraud From Tulip Mania to Bernie Madoff.
Tulip mania in Holland led to single bulb values at their height being worth 10 times the average working man's salary.
Shih compared the rapid inflation of Bitcoin to famous historic economic bubbles, like Tulip mania, the Mississippi Bubble, the South Sea Bubble, and the Dotcom Bubble, and stated that if the Bitcoin bubble bursts it may be the largest bubble to ever pop in history.
As discussed in History Lesson Tulip Mania, bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies likely serve a societal good in that they are helping prove out a new technology known as blockchain (an open-source, supposedly anonymous ledger that reduces the risk of illegitimate transactions), which will likely be profitably implemented in many commercial settings (i.e.
The classic business school example of a speculative market is the "tulip mania" during the 1630s, in Holland (now the Netherlands).
Tulip mania is considered to be the first recorded speculative bubble in history dating back to the 1600s during the Dutch Golden Age.