tulipomania


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tulipomania

(ˌtjuːlɪpəˈmeɪnɪə)
n
(Horticulture) an extreme enthusiasm for growing and collecting tulips
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tulipomania

a mania for planting and growing tulips, especially such a mania in Holland in the 1630s, when a sum equivalent to $5200 was paid for a single bulb. — tulipomaniac, n.
See also: Flowers
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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All at once, Cornelius van Baerle, who, after all his learned pursuits, had been seized with the tulipomania, made some changes in his house at Dort, which, as we have stated, was next door to that of Boxtel.
It seems that such contracts were used for the first time during the Dutch Tulipomania in 1630 (Popa, 1994: 143).
And, of course, we mustn't forget that mirage-bubble which in some form is always part of Wall Street and its continuing replay of Holland's 17th century Tulipomania, what some of us might consider a business-morality play.
ySTANBUL (CyHAN)- A new opera titled "Lale Ecylgynlyy-y" (Tulipomania), with a score by young Turkish composer Ali Hoca and a libretto by veteran journalist and classical music critic E[currency]efik Kahramankaptan, will have its world premiere next month in Antalya.
In one such playful narrative, because "a theft lies behind the rise of the tulip in Holland," (3) Ali/x takes advantage of the unarticulated spaces between fact and fiction and strategically inserts Ali, a queer working-class Turkish figure referred to as "the exotic of the East," (4) into the very real historical accounts of tulipomania in Europe (1636-37).
It is not until I carefully view and research the larger work Tulipomania (porcelain, wood, gold leaf, bone) that I begin to think about the political connotations.
Tulipomania led a trading system similar to a stock exchange.
British historian and journalist Mike Dash, a former editor of the Fortean Times, has written several critically acclaimed works of popular history, including Tulipomania and Batavia's Graveyard: The True Story of the Mad Heretic Who Led History's Bloodiest Mutiny.
When reduced to its essentials, however--the 61 pages of prose (and that's not a lot)--the book only really provides a standard account of a very familiar story: the hunt for spices, tulipomania, the long and winding tale of tea, the evolution of the garden, and all the rest.
When tulipomania burned out, so did the Dutch economy.
in Victorian England, where it echoed the outbreak of Dutch tulipomania