Tunbridge ware

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Tun′bridge ware`

(ˈtʌnˌbrɪdʒ)
n.
wooden articles with mosaiclike marquetry sawn from wooden rods arranged and glued together to form a pattern.
[1765–75; orig. produced in Tunbridge Wells]
References in classic literature ?
Within abundance of silver paper was a pretty little Tunbridgeware box, which Harriet opened: it was well lined with the softest cotton; but, excepting the cotton, Emma saw only a small piece of courtplaister.
Inlays were replaced in the 19th century with sheets of materials such as bone, horn and porcupine quills, engraved with neo-classical designs of scrolling foliage and chequerboard picked out in black, the designs reminiscent of Tunbridgeware.
And for the early pieces, you can expect to pay high prices, this Victorian rosewood Tunbridgeware jewellery cabinet, with cushion shaped top, two doors with mosaic floral spray opening to reveal three drawers has an estimate of PS300-500 at auction.
Mark Hannam, senior valuer and auctioneer at Bonhams, with a selection of the Tunbridgeware coming up for auction in Knowle tomorrow.
Tortoiseshell, Ivory, Mother-of-Pearl Oriental Items, Tunbridgeware, Tea Caddies, Boxes & Objects of Vertu
The centre of the fold-over top has a Tunbridgeware outline of the Crystal Palace.
Throughout the Victorian period the production of tea caddies continued to reflect the styles and fashions of the era with the advent of caddies made from papier mache adorned with gilt, mother of pearl, Tunbridgeware and silver.
Dianne Brick, of Amherst Antiques, Kent, who provided last week's photos will also at the fair showing her Tunbridgeware pieces.
For those most difficult to buy for - men - there are antique clocks and barometers, fine calling card cases from Simply Antiques, Japanese woodblocks, wood carvings and netsuke, alongside Tunbridgeware boxes, antique walking canes and sticks and small unusual items.
All Tunbridgeware images supplied by Dianne Brick, of Amherst Antiques, Kent, who will at the NEC fair showing these and many other Tunbridgeware pieces.
For those most difficult to buy for - arguably the menfolk - there are antique clocks and barometers, fine calling card cases from Simply Antiques, Japanese woodblocks, wood carvings and netsuke alongside Tunbridgeware boxes, antique walking canes and sticks and small unusual items.
They are all examples of Tunbridgeware, a type of souvenir to be treasured more than most.