turbojet

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turbojet

tur·bo·jet

 (tûr′bō-jĕt′)
n.
1. A jet engine having a turbine-driven compressor and developing thrust from the exhaust of hot gases.
2. An aircraft in which a turbojet is used.

turbojet

(ˈtɜːbəʊˌdʒɛt)
n
1. (Aeronautics) short for turbojet engine
2. (Aeronautics) an aircraft powered by one or more turbojet engines

tur•bo•jet

(ˈtɜr boʊˌdʒɛt)

n.
2. an airplane equipped with one or more turbojet engines.
[1940–45]
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tur·bo·jet

(tûr′bō-jĕt′)
1. A jet engine in which the exhaust gas operates a turbine that in turn drives a compressor that forces air into the intake of the engine.
2. An aircraft powered by an engine or engines of this type.
Did You Know? Fully loaded, a jumbo-sized airliner weighs nearly 800,000 pounds. Yet its turbojet engines are so powerful that it hurtles down the runway fast enough to lift it into air and climb to 35,000 feet. Where does this power come from? From the movement of air itself. Every turbojet has a compressor, a series of small rotating fan blades. These blades draw in air and pressurize it, driving it back into a combustion chamber where a fuel (such as kerosene) is injected and ignited. The burning of the fuel causes the air to expand, adding to the already high pressure and causing the mixture of hot air and gas to rush over turbines with enormous speed. This causes the turbine blades to turn, and they spin a drive shaft that rotates the compressor fans. The hot pressurized air then blasts out the rear opening of the engine, forcing the plane forward. Most turbojet engines today are turbofans and have a large fan at the front that is turned by one of the turbines. Every second, the fan sucks in enough air to empty an average-sized house, adding to the volume and pressure of the air rotating the turbines and providing forward thrust.

turbojet

A jet engine whose air is supplied by a turbine-driven compressor, the turbine being activated by exhaust gases.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turbojet - an airplane propelled by a fanjet engine
fanjet engine, turbofan engine, turbojet engine, turbojet, turbofan, fanjet, fan-jet - a jet engine in which a fan driven by a turbine provides extra air to the burner and gives extra thrust
jet, jet plane, jet-propelled plane - an airplane powered by one or more jet engines
2.turbojet - a jet engine in which a fan driven by a turbine provides extra air to the burner and gives extra thrustturbojet - a jet engine in which a fan driven by a turbine provides extra air to the burner and gives extra thrust
afterburner - a device injects fuel into a hot exhaust for extra thrust
fanjet, fan-jet, turbofan, turbojet - an airplane propelled by a fanjet engine
gas turbine - turbine that converts the chemical energy of a liquid fuel into mechanical energy by internal combustion; gaseous products of the fuel (which is burned in compressed air) are expanded through a turbine
jet engine - a gas turbine produces a stream of hot gas that propels a jet plane by reaction propulsion
propjet, turboprop, turbo-propeller plane - an airplane with an external propeller that is driven by a turbojet engine
Translations

turbojet

[ˈtɜːbəʊˈdʒet]
A. Nturborreactor m
B. CPDturborreactor

turbojet

[ˈtɜːrbəʊdʒɛt] nturboréacteur m

turbojet

n (= engine)Turbotriebwerk nt; (= aircraft)Düsenflugzeug nt, → Turbojet m

turbojet

[ˌtɜːbəʊˈdʒɛt] nturbogetto, turboreattore m
References in periodicals archive ?
During December 2018, turbojets, motor cars and parts of aircraft were at the top of the imported group of commodities.
They were followed by turbojets, turbo propellers and other gas turbines, which showed an annual increase of 61.6 percent to QR0.4 billion In January, China imported the most amount of goods to Qatar, accounting for 14.4 percent or QR1.4 billion of the total share.
Type Rating Initial Training: Section 61.31 of the FARs prescribes the requirement for type-rating training in turbojets, including single-pilot operation.
The patent says that the air vehicle will be "propelled by a system of rockets formed of turbojets and a rocket motor which can be made streamlined to reduce the drag of the base during the cruise phase".
Cenco designs, installs, and supports test cells and test equipment for all types of aerospace propulsion, from the largest civil turbofan engines and military turbojets to turboshaft engines and APU s.
The second X-48B was modified into the C model, powered by two larger (but still small) turbojets and with the vertical stabilizers moved inboard and the trailing edge between the fins extended aft.
There are piston aeroengines from the early 1900s, such as the Alvaston and the Humber; turbojets such as the Olympus, which powered the Vulcan; and the reheated Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan, the largest engine in the collection.
When jet-engined commercial frights first started in the 1750's, aircraft were powered by turbojets - jet engines in which all thrust was provided by gases that went through the engine from inlet to exhaust nozzle, exiting in a single high velocity jet.
Edholm and powered by two Westinghouse J34-WE-30 turbojets. It entered service in 1949, the year the Soviet Union exploded its first atomic bomb.
The pounds 5million Buccaneer, powered by two Rolls-Royce turbojets and designed to carry five tons of nuclear bombs and missiles, later formed part of 12 Squadron, based at Lossiemouth.
-- built the world's first turbojets on the eve of World War II, working with no knowledge of each other's activity until years later.
To get from a standing start to orbit, the NASP will need at least three different engine systems, including turbojets to allow the plane to fly at low speeds; an as-yet-theoretical ramjet/scramjet combination, which will take the plane from supersonic to hypersonic speeds; and rockets to accelerate the plane to and from orbital velocity.