Turing test


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Turing test

n.
A test in which one or more judges, by conversing with an unseen interlocutor via text messages, attempt to determine whether the interlocutor is a human or a computer.

[After Alan Mathison Turing, who proposed such a test as a criterion for judging the sophistication of artificial intelligence.]

Turing test

n
(Logic) a proposed test of a computer's ability to think, requiring that the covert substitution of the computer for one of the participants in a keyboard and screen dialogue should be undetectable by the remaining human participant
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Let's assume that the robot resembles an average human and passes the Turing test, and that he is thoroughly familiar not only with Jewish foundational texts like the Torah, the rest of the Tanakh and the Talmud, but also all that followed, up to and including today's Jewish literature and philosophies.
This test, which stands for the "Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart," is used during almost every shopping transaction and account creation.
Turing developed the Turing Test, which measures a machine's intellectual ability and Laarmans created an algorithm to fuse two different material properties into one functional object ?
As a result, it still will not pass the Turing Test, that was designed by computer scientist Alan Turing to know when a machine sounds indistinguishable from a human being.
Most famous as the man behind the Enigma code-breaking machine during the Second World War, the English computer scientist and mathematician spent his time postwar devising the Turing Test. Basic but effective in nature, the test involves seeing if artificial intelligence can hold a realistic conversation with a human being, thereby convincing them they are also human.
One of the most frustrating things you'll go through when logging into an online service or completing a payment is that pesky, dreaded CAPTCHA (completely automated public Turing test to tell computers and humans apart).
(11) It was at that moment that I had the following thought: What if we could develop a "spiritual" Turing test that would allow us to determine whether or not the hateful bigots fighting for white supremacy still possess some spark of humanity?
For instance, the Turing Test is no longer sufficient because it does not produce a result that indicates a complete lack of intelligence when AI fails it.
A captcha, or Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart, is designed based on the Turing test.