Turing test

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Turing test

n.
A test in which one or more judges, by conversing with an unseen interlocutor via text messages, attempt to determine whether the interlocutor is a human or a computer.

[After Alan Mathison Turing, who proposed such a test as a criterion for judging the sophistication of artificial intelligence.]

Turing test

n
(Logic) a proposed test of a computer's ability to think, requiring that the covert substitution of the computer for one of the participants in a keyboard and screen dialogue should be undetectable by the remaining human participant
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Traditional Turing tests permit counterfeiting and require matching only a narrowly defined level of human performance.
The scientists then compared the outputs from both humans and machines through 'visual Turing tests.
In fact, Michael Casey, a professor of music and computer science at Dartmouth College, plans to hold several Turing tests early next year, perhaps followed by some Lovelace tests.
GOTCHA (Generating panOptic Turing Tests to Tell Computers and Humans Apart) would be suitable for protecting high-value accounts, such as bank accounts, medical records and other sensitive information.
Nor have annual Turing tests, conducted under the auspices of the Loebner Prize, crowned a computer victor.
A general solution of "reverse Turing tests" was introduced by Moni Naor [11] and later popularized as "Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart" (CAPTCHA) (Moni, 2008, Ahn et al, 2003).
Deliver on that promise and meet the e-reader Turing tests, and I'll place my order.
Machines that pass Turing Tests operate with sets of rules so they can appear human--one machine even was programmed to make typing "mistakes" in order to appear more human.
The whole process, in short, is very much an ongoing series of natural, concrete Turing tests.
Completely automated public Turing tests to tell computers and humans apart (CAPTCHAs) are implemented on many Web sites to verify that the user is human, as opposed to an automated program.
New features on this version of Spam Sleuth include E-mail Stamps, which charge companies a fee to send spam, and Turing Tests, which force suspected spammers to answer questions in order for their e-mails to be delivered.
He thinks that the Turing Test won't be decided in a single big event; instead, "miniature Turing Tests are happening all the time, every day, whenever a person puts up with stupid computer software.