Turin

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Tu·rin

 (to͝or′ĭn, tyo͝or′-) also To·ri·no (tô-rē′nô)
A city of northwest Italy on the Po River west-southwest of Milan. An important Roman town, it was later a Lombard duchy and the capital of the kingdom of Sardinia (1720-1861). It was also the first capital of the new kingdom of Italy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Turin

(tjʊəˈrɪn)
n
(Placename) a city in NW Italy, capital of Piedmont region, on the River Po: became capital of the Kingdom of Sardinia in 1720; first capital (1861–65) of united Italy; university (1405); a major industrial centre, producing most of Italy's cars. Pop: 865 263 (2001). Italian name: Torino
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Tu•rin

(ˈtʊər ɪn, ˈtyʊər-, tʊˈrɪn, tyʊ-)

n.
a city in NW Italy, on the Po River. 1,025,390. Italian, Torino.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Turin - capital city of the Piemonte region of northwestern ItalyTurin - capital city of the Piemonte region of northwestern Italy
Piemonte, Piedmont - the region of northwestern Italy; includes the Po valley
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Turín
Turin
Torino
Torino

Turin

[tjʊˈrɪn] NTurín m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Turin

[ˌtjʊəˈrɪn] nTurin
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Turin

[tjʊəˈrɪn] nTorino f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Coplan, Veit Erlmann, and Thomas Turino, Meintjes examines the politics associated with the commodification of Zulu music in the world-beat circles, raising questions concerning cultural heritage, intellectual property, and power relations.
The band, featuring Pete Bernhard, Lucia Turino, and Cooper McBean, will play the Manchester Academy in support of their latest release, Chains Are Broken.
Instead, the message of social change was delivered as a soundtrack for social change, following Turino's (2008) assertion that music functions in every dimension of our lives, becoming, as suggested by Nyairo and Ogude (2005), interwoven with events.
According to witnesses and Robert Turino, Barangay Paminan Chairman, Karapatan said the victims were illegally arrested and brought to the military camp in Rogus, Cauyan City.
Chapter 4 contains case studies of different formal and informal instances of the 'ethno-industry' of cultural tourism, and here O Briain draws heavily on Thomas Turino's (2008) model of 'presentational' and 'participatory' performances in order to show how these staged shows, which supposedly demonstrate how the state is working for the preservation of the cultural heritage of its ethnic minorities, are completely decontextualized and bear no relationship to Hmong culture.
Owner Feil Organization was represented in-house by David Turino.
In my analysis, I employ ethnomusicologist Thomas Turino's notion of Indigenous as "people and lifeways that are part of cultural trajectories with roots predating the colonial period or that, in terms of ethos and practice, provide local alternatives to cosmopolitanism" (18).
(10) Ver Turino (1988:78, 79), Mayta y Gerard (2010:179, 196) y San Martin (2009:28, 31) respecto de este sistema de entrelazado musical en otros bailes de flautas andinos.
Los denominados <<Estudios de la performance>>--desde Turner (1992) en adelante--, la <<Fenomenologia cultural del embodiment>> o corporalidad (Csordas, 1994), asi como los campos de la <<Antropologia de la musica>>, <<la danza>> y <<el teatro y el espectaculo>> (respectivamente, Turino 1999; Reed,1998; Beeman,1993; entre otros), vienen destacando la necesidad de abordar los aspectos estetico-sensibles y afectivos de las manifestaciones culturales, los cuales muchas veces fueron subestimados, por el predominio logocentrico vigente aun en nuestra disciplina.
(24.) Thomas Turino, Music as Social Life: The Politics of Participation (Chicago: Univ.