Turkish


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Turk·ish

 (tûr′kĭsh)
adj.
Of or relating to Turkey or its peoples, languages, or cultures.
n.
1. The Turkic language of Turkey.
2. Ottoman Turkish.

Turkish

(ˈtɜːkɪʃ)
adj
(Languages) of, relating to, or characteristic of Turkey, its people, or their language
n
(Languages) the official language of Turkey, belonging to the Turkic branch of the Altaic family. See also Osmanli
ˈTurkishness n

Turk•ish

(ˈtɜr kɪʃ)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Turkey, its inhabitants, or the language Turkish.
2. Turkic.
n.
3. the Turkic language of Turkey.
4. Turkic.
[1835–45]
Turk′ish•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turkish - a Turkic language spoken by the TurksTurkish - a Turkic language spoken by the Turks
Turkic, Turkic language, Turko-Tatar, Turki - a subfamily of Altaic languages
Adj.1.turkish - of or relating to or characteristic of Turkey or its people or languageTurkish - of or relating to or characteristic of Turkey or its people or language; "Turkish towels"
Translations
турски
tureckýturečtina
tyrkertyrkisk
Turka
turkkilainenturkin kieliturkki
turskiturski jezik
török
トルコのトルコ語
터키 사람터키의
turkiskturkiskaturkiskt
เกี่ยวกับตุรกีภาษาตุรกี
TürkTürkçeTürk dili
thuộc nước/người/tiếng Thổ Nhĩ Kỳtiếng Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ

Turkish

[ˈtɜːkɪʃ]
A. ADJturco
B. N (= language) → turco m
C. CPD Turkish bath Nbaño m turco
Turkish coffee Ncafé m turco
Turkish delight Nlokum m, capricho m de reina
Turkish towel N (US) → toalla f

Turkish

[ˈtɜːrkɪʃ]
adjturc(turque)
n (LINGUISTICS)turc mTurkish bath nbain m turcTurkish delight nloukoum m

Turkish

adjtürkisch; she is Turkishsie ist Türkin
n (Ling) → Türkisch nt

Turkish

:
Turkish bath
Turkish coffee
Turkish delight
nLokum nt
Turkish towel

Turkish

[ˈtɜːkɪʃ]
1. adjturco/a
2. n (language) → turco

turkish

تُركي, تُرْكِيّ turecký, turečtina tyrker, tyrkisk türkisch Τουρκικά, τουρκικός turco turkin kieli, turkkilainen turc turski turco トルコの, トルコ語 터키 사람, 터키의 Turks tyrker, tyrkisk język turecki, turecki turco турецкий turkisk, turkiska เกี่ยวกับตุรกี, ภาษาตุรกี Türk, Türkçe thuộc nước/người/tiếng Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ, tiếng Thổ Nhĩ Kỳ 土耳其人, 土耳其的
Turkish   
References in classic literature ?
There I saw and observed how the opportunity of capturing the whole Turkish fleet in harbour was lost; for all the marines and janizzaries that belonged to it made sure that they were about to be attacked inside the very harbour, and had their kits and pasamaques, or shoes, ready to flee at once on shore without waiting to be assailed, in so great fear did they stand of our fleet.
He was roused by Mr Fledgeby's appearing erect at the foot of the bed, in Turkish slippers, rose-coloured Turkish trousers (got cheap from somebody who had cheated some other somebody out of them), and a gown and cap to correspond.
I had come ashore with only two pieces of money, both about the same size, but differing largely in value--one was a French gold piece worth four dollars, the other a Turkish coin worth two cents and a half.
The inside of the dome is figured all over with a monstrous inscription in Turkish characters, wrought in gold mosaic, that looks as glaring as a circus bill; the pavements and the marble balustrades are all battered and dirty; the perspective is marred every where by a web of ropes that depend from the dizzy height of the dome, and suspend countless dingy, coarse oil lamps, and ostrich-eggs, six or seven feet above the floor.
He was a Turkish merchant and had inhabited Paris for many years, when, for some reason which I could not learn, he became obnoxious to the government.
"Ah, we must have some Richmond Gems or Turkish. I wish, pa, when you go into town, you would get me some Turkish."
And some three centuries ago, an English traveller in old Harris's Voyages, speaks of a Turkish Mosque built in honor of Jonah, in which mosque was a miraculous lamp that burnt without any oil.
Having received an ultimatum from Austria, the Turkish Ministry met to consider it.
Papoosh Pasha, the Turkish Ambassador (attended by Kibob Bey, dragoman of the mission), the Marquess of Steyne, Earl of Southdown, Sir Pitt and Lady Jane Crawley, Mr.
Maybe it is set up by the Sultan's orders for the impaling of a horde of Turkish robbers, one by one.
They were armed with crooked sabres, having the hilt and baldric inlaid with gold, and matched with Turkish daggers of yet more costly workmanship.
Kutuzov walked through the ranks, sometimes stopping to say a few friendly words to officers he had known in the Turkish war, sometimes also to the soldiers.