Turning plow

Related to Turning plow: moldboard plow, mouldboard plough, ploughs

Turning plow

A plow designed to pulverize a ribbon of earth a few inches wide, and turn it over so that surface trash is buried. The turning plow uses a moldboard to do the turning. The moldboard concept was apparently developed in the eleventh century in the temperate region of Europe. By 1200 a.d., European moldboard plows had developed into ponderous wheeled machines drawn by several oxen, and did more stirring than turning. It took until the mid-1700s for moldboards to advance to the point that they would really turn the soil. Even then, there was no standardization of design, nor any real understanding of the principles involved. That came in the 1780s when Thomas Jefferson in the U.S. and James Small in Scotland began mathematical studies of the moldboard shape that eventually led to rather efficient designs. See Walking turning plow.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hydraulic functions required for use in turning plow, scraper apparatus, takahiekoittimen and transom.
Instead of using the 1-way disc plows most of their neighbors favored, the Carters pulled an Oliver turning plow with a John Deere Model D tractor.
In the fall, when weather permitted, a turning plow with a half-winged metal foot was used to dig peanuts.
I've found a Lynchburg Model S2 right-handed, mule-drawn turning plow that I believe to be a salesman sample.
For example, the rotary mower attachment, priced at $82 in 1949, sold for $67.50 in 1954, and the 6inch turning plow, priced at $9.90 in 1951, sold for $3.75.
I hear farmers tell of turning plows, moldboard plows, disc harrows, cultivators and all sorts of farm equipment.
Most of the farmers now use cultivators for land preparation (plowing), although some progressive farmers use disc harrows, rotavators and soil turning plows. Conventional land preparation (six-plowing and three-planking) and sowing costs were almost equal to costs incurred on the bed and furrow method, but five fold higher than for no-till, which was followed by a moderate irrigation to germinate the wheat.

Full browser ?