turnover rate

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Noun1.turnover rate - the ratio of the number of workers that had to be replaced in a given time period to the average number of workersturnover rate - the ratio of the number of workers that had to be replaced in a given time period to the average number of workers
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
References in periodicals archive ?
Q3 large carrier driver turnover rates remain high.
Lewis find that turnover rates for career federal employees are higher in the first few years of a new administration than at other times.
Labor turnover rates were also high in education (6.
Turnover rates in real estate, retail, logistics and consumer goods are also higher than the national average.
Multifamily Housing Industry Turnover Rates Employee Overall Senior Regional Turnover Rate Rate Executive Executive 2001 Average 38.
Dubai: Companies in the UAE continue to face high turnover rates because there are many employment opportunities in the country and candidates are seeking better remuneration to cope with rising living costs.
Evidence of a "culture of turnover" in New Zealand, more commonly associated with industries staffed by low-skilled workers, is the unsettling conclusion of a study into nurse turnover rates, published in the Journal of Nursing Management this year.
The turnover rates were going down during the recession," he said.
Key findings include: (1) Kentucky school districts averaged one superintendent turnover during 1998/99-2007/08; (2) Average superintendent turnover rates in rural and nonrural school districts over 1998/99-2007/08 were within one-tenth of a point of each other; (3) Average superintendent turnover rates in Appalachian and non-Appalachian school districts over 1998/99-2007/08 were within one-tenth of a point of each other; (4) Statewide, superintendent turnover varied with school districts' demographic, fiscal, and achievement characteristics.
The authors explain that the connection between teacher turnover and child outcomes is complex, since the centers with high teacher turnover rates and lower levels of child outcomes also are characterized by their poor quality.
The turnover rates within health care are rather significant.