turret

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Related to Turrets: Tourrets

tur·ret

 (tûr′ĭt, tŭr′-)
n.
1. A small tower or tower-shaped projection on a building.
2.
a. A low, heavily armored structure, usually rotating horizontally, containing mounted guns and their gunners or crew, as on a warship or tank.
b. A domelike gunner's enclosure projecting from the fuselage of a combat aircraft.
3. A tall wooden structure mounted on wheels and used in ancient warfare by besiegers to scale the walls of an enemy fortress.
4. An attachment for a lathe consisting of a rotating cylindrical block holding various cutting tools.
5. A rotating device holding various lenses, as for a microscope, allowing easy switching from one lens to another.

[Middle English turet, from Old French torete, diminutive of tor, tower; see tower.]

turret

(ˈtʌrɪt)
n
1. (Architecture) a small tower that projects from the wall of a building, esp a medieval castle
2. (Military)
a. a self-contained structure, capable of rotation, in which weapons are mounted, esp in tanks and warships
b. a similar structure on an aircraft that houses one or more guns and sometimes a gunner
3. (Fortifications) a tall wooden tower on wheels used formerly by besiegers to scale the walls of a fortress
4. (Mechanical Engineering) (on a machine tool) a turret-like steel structure with tools projecting radially that can be indexed round to select or to bring each tool to bear on the work
[C14: from Old French torete, from tor tower, from Latin turris]

tur•ret

(ˈtɜr ɪt, ˈtʌr-)

n.
1. a small tower, usu. one forming part of a larger structure.
2. a small tower at an angle of a building, as of a castle or fortress, frequently beginning some distance above the ground.
3. a domelike structure, usu. revolving horizontally, in which a gun is mounted, as on an armored vehicle, ship, or aircraft.
4. Also called tur′ret•head` (-ˌhɛd) a pivoted attachment on a lathe or the like for holding a number of tools.
[1300–50; Middle English turet < Middle French turete=tur tower1 + -ete -et]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turret - a small tower extending above a buildingturret - a small tower extending above a building
castle - a large building formerly occupied by a ruler and fortified against attack
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building
2.turret - a self-contained weapons platform housing guns and capable of rotationturret - a self-contained weapons platform housing guns and capable of rotation
weapons platform, platform - any military structure or vehicle bearing weapons
armored combat vehicle, armoured combat vehicle, army tank, tank - an enclosed armored military vehicle; has a cannon and moves on caterpillar treads
Translations
بُرْجبُرْج دَوّار في سَفينَه
střelecká věžvěžička
kanontårnlille tårn
kis toronypáncéltorony
byssuturnsmáturn
bruņutornistornītis
strelecká veža
döner çelik kuleküçük kuletaret

turret

[ˈtʌrɪt] N [of castle] → torreón m; [of tank, warship, aircraft] → torreta f (Mil, Hist) → torre f, torrecilla f (US) (Tech) → cabrestante m

turret

[ˈtʌrɪt] n
(on castle, tower)tourelle f
(on tank, warship)tourelle f

turret

n (Archit) → Mauer- or Eckturm m; (on tank) → Turm m; (on ship) → Gefechtsturm m

turret

[ˈtʌrɪt] ntorretta

turret

(ˈtarit) , ((American) ˈtə:rit) noun
1. a small tower. A fortress often has turrets.
2. steel protecting gunners on a tank, plane etc.
References in classic literature ?
No rays from the holy heaven come down On the long night-time of that town; But light from out the lurid sea Streams up the turrets silently - Gleams up the pinnacles far and free - Up domes - up spires - up kingly halls - Up fanes - up Babylon-like walls - Up shadowy long-forgotten bowers Of scultured ivy and stone flowers - Up many and many a marvellous shrine Whose wreathed friezes intertwine The viol, the violet, and the vine.
So blend the turrets and shadows there That all seem pendulous in air, While from a proud tower in the town Death looks gigantically down.
And in all the four corners of that court, fair staircases, cast into turrets, on the outside, and not within the row of buildings themselves.
There was an exchange of bugle blasts; then a parley from the walls, where men-at-arms, in hauberk and morion, marched back and forth with halberd at shoulder under flapping banners with the rude figure of a dragon displayed upon them; and then the great gates were flung open, the drawbridge was lowered, and the head of the cavalcade swept forward under the frowning arches; and we, following, soon found ourselves in a great paved court, with towers and turrets stretching up into the blue air on all the four sides; and all about us the dismount was going on, and much greeting and ceremony, and running to and fro, and a gay display of moving and intermingling colors, and an altogether pleasant stir and noise and confusion.
The turrets of a convent stood out beyond a wild virgin pine forest, and far away on the other side of the Enns the enemy's horse patrols could be discerned.
He unlocked the wicket gate of the turret stair and went out on the roof.
The turret in which the light appeared being at one corner of the building, and only divided from the path by one of the garden- walks, upon which this gate opened, Mr Haredale threw up the window directly, and demanded who was there.
There remains to-day but a very imperceptible vestige of the Place de Grève, such as it existed then; it consists in the charming little turret, which occupies the angle north of the Place, and which, already enshrouded in the ignoble plaster which fills with paste the delicate lines of its sculpture, would soon have disappeared, perhaps submerged by that flood of new houses which so rapidly devours all the ancient façades of Paris.
So the Tin Woodman had employed them in building his magnificent castle, which was all of tin, from the ground to the tallest turret, and so brightly polished that it glittered in the sun's rays more gorgeously than silver.
The access, as usual in castles of the period, lay through an arched barbican, or outwork, which was terminated and defended by a small turret at each corner.
But mark you now yonder lofty turret in the centre, which stands back from the river and hath a broad banner upon the summit.
When Prince Bladud had been shut up in the lofty turret for the greater part of a year, with no better prospect before his bodily eyes than a stone wall, or before his mental vision than prolonged imprisonment, he naturally began to ruminate on a plan of escape, which, after months of preparation, he managed to accomplish; considerately leaving his dinner-knife in the heart of his jailer, lest the poor fellow (who had a family) should be considered privy to his flight, and punished accordingly by the infuriated king.