turtledove

(redirected from Turtle-dove)

tur·tle·dove

also turtle dove or turtle-dove  (tûr′tl-dŭv′)
n.
1. A small, slender dove (Streptopelia turtur) of Eurasia and Africa, having a white-edged tail and a soft purring voice.
2. Any of several other doves of the genus Streptopelia.

turtledove

(ˈtɜːtəlˌdʌv)
n
1. (Animals) any of several Old World doves of the genus Streptopelia, having a brown plumage with speckled wings and a long dark tail
2. a gentle or loving person
[see turtle2]

tur•tle•dove

(ˈtɜr tlˌdʌv)

n.
1. any of several small to medium-sized Old World doves of the genus Streptopelia, esp. S. turtur, of Europe, having a long, graduated tail.
[1250–1300; Middle English turtildove; see turtle2, dove1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.turtledove - small Australian doveturtledove - small Australian dove    
dove - any of numerous small pigeons
genus Stictopelia, Stictopelia - a genus of Columbidae
2.turtledove - any of several Old World wild dovesturtledove - any of several Old World wild doves
dove - any of numerous small pigeons
Streptopelia turtur - the common European wild dove noted for its plaintive cooing
ringdove, Streptopelia risoria - greyish Old World turtledove with a black band around the neck; often caged
Translations

turtledove

[ˈtɜːtldʌv] Ntórtola f

turtledove

[ˈtɜːtlˌdʌv] ntortora
References in classic literature ?
From the molten-golden notes, And all in tune, What a liquid ditty floats To the turtle-dove that listens, while she gloats On the moon
Faith," said Ford, "this air of Bordeaux hath turned our turtle-dove into a game-cock.
It was a beautiful evening; the last rays of the setting sun shone bright through the long stems of the trees upon the green underwood beneath, and the turtle-doves sang from the tall birches.
Noo aboot the dinner o' they twa turtle-doves in the parlor?
I long ago lost a hound, a bay horse, and a turtle-dove, and am still on their trail.
For while the purpose of Hound, Bay Horse, and Turtle-Dove is to document the range and pattern of critical responses to Thoreau's fable, the book ultimately makes an argument for the literary and rhetorical value of obscurity as a rhetorical technique.
You get bloke-lit favourite Mike Gayle sticking to type with the story of Mr and Mrs Turtle-Dove having relationship counselling.
It may be hybridizing with another Old World species, the Ringed Turtle-Dove, which escapes captivity but doesn't seem to be established as a breeder yet.
Oboes cooed like turtle-doves, the flute cast a pastel spell, and the theorbo rasped tellingly in the well-paced recitatives.