polo neck

(redirected from Turtleneck sweaters)

polo neck

A tubular collar for a sweater or shirt, worn rolled down.
Translations

polo neck

(Brit)
nRollkragen m; (= sweater)Rollkragenpullover m
adjRollkragen-; polo neck sweaterRollkragenpullover m

polo neck

1. n (collar) → collo alto (also polo neck sweater) → dolcevita
2. adja collo alto
References in periodicals archive ?
Traditional pieces, such as pleated A-line skirts, turtleneck sweaters with stripes, crewneck T-shirts and sweater dresses, round out a complete varsity wardrobe.
Tenders are invited for Delivery type turtleneck sweaters
Classic military coats or Victorian collars were paired with turtleneck sweaters and maxi dresses in shades of dark peach, nut, coffee, midnight blue and jet black.
au, Zuckerberg wore the same tie for a year, while Dorsey swears by his regular saunas and Jobs had a collection of 100 Issey Miyake designed black turtleneck sweaters that he wore everyday, so that their attention could be channelised to much important tasks at work.
Why do they dump me for men who wear turtleneck sweaters and smoke a pipe?
There, on a quiet street "with its flower boxes, gingko trees, and old-fashioned lampposts from the gaslight era," live Frank and Eleanor, he a forty-something sound engineer with two sons from his first marriage (who live with their mother) and a fondness for turtleneck sweaters and pot, she a book publicist with a tamed wild streak (she once owned a motorcycle, which she crashed) who possesses a "crisp, cheerful, matter of fact voice" and a teenage daughter (away at riding camp).
Then came the Beat Generation, in their turtleneck sweaters, berets and dark glasses, and the Teddy Boys with their long drape jackets, swept back haircuts and crepe-soled shoes.
And when the profoundly talented Ms Keaton enters the fray as the excruciatingly uptight New York playwright Erica Barry - she wears turtleneck sweaters in the summer - it just keeps getting better.
CARL: Lucky I wear turtleneck sweaters, even in the summer.
Toni Home Perms, Midnight in Paris, black turtleneck sweaters and Jell-O with baby marshmallows: how reassuring to have the 1950s served up by a woman novelist and not by the likes of Oliver Stone.