Tusculan


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Tusculan

(ˈtʌskjʊlən)
adj
(Placename) of or relating to the ancient Italian city of Tusculum or its inhabitants
References in classic literature ?
He said, "It was a mere abuse of words to call those things evils, in which there was no moral unfitness: that pain, which was the worst consequence of such accidents, was the most contemptible thing in the world;" with more of the like sentences, extracted out of the second book of Tully's Tusculan questions, and from the great Lord Shaftesbury.
While most early modern voyages describe many dangers, as James does, few paraphrase Cicero's Tusculan Disputations.
That was why Jefferson recommended reading history for its moral "lessons" but he also recommended reading morally uplifting novels like Cervantes's Don Quixote and Sterne's A Sentimental Traveller; ancient ethical works such as Cicero's Tusculan Disputations and Seneca's Moral Essays; utopian works such as Mercier's LAn 2440 and Harrington's Oceana; and even morally moving sermons, like those of Reverends Sterne, Massillon, and Bourdaloue.
Cicero (whom Stark mentions only twice and not in the chapter on Rome) makes a similar claim for Roman distinction at the beginning of the Tusculan Disputations.
17) Ortelius put a legend below the world map--a quote from Cicero's Tusculan Disputations (4.
First, we divide all things into those in our power and those that are not (Epictetus, Enchiridion 1; Cicero, Tusculan disputations V.
The short interval between a copy of De oratore, dated 20 December 1499, and a copy of the Tusculan Disputations, dated 10 February 1500, shows that it took him about seven weeks to produce a small volume of 200 to 300 pages in italic script with simple decoration.
Valga mencionar, como ejemplo, la parafrasis que de el elabora Ciceron, en Tusculan Disputations 1.
21) "Libido poeniendi eius qui uideatur laesisse iniuria" (Cicero, Tusculan Dis putations 4:21).
Cicero Tusculan Disputations 4: All of Anacreon's making of poetry is amorous.
It is useful to consider what Cicero, writing in propria persona in Book V of the Tusculan Disputations, regarded as the essence of his claim to being a follower of Socrates: