Tussilago farfara


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Related to Tussilago farfara: Verbascum thapsus, Althaea officinalis, Turnera diffusa
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Noun1.Tussilago farfara - perennial herb with large rounded leaves resembling a colt's foot and yellow flowers appearing before the leaves doTussilago farfara - perennial herb with large rounded leaves resembling a colt's foot and yellow flowers appearing before the leaves do; native to Europe but now nearly cosmopolitan; used medicinally especially formerly
genus Tussilago, Tussilago - genus of low creeping yellow-flowered perennial herbs of north temperate regions: coltsfoots; in some classifications includes species often placed in other genera especially Homogyne and Petasites
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
References in periodicals archive ?
Wider studies enabled identification of species such as Achillea millefolium, Artriplex nitens, Chenopodium album, Cirsium arvense, Daucus carota, Matricaria inodora, Picris hieracioides, Sonchus arvensis, Sonchus Asper, Tussilago farfara and Verbascum Thapsus (Ciesielczuk et al.
INCI: Tussilago farfara flower extract (and) achillea millefolium extract (and) cinchona succirubra bark extract (and) water (and) butylene glycol
Djordjevic-Miloradovic (1997) working on the reproductive effort of Tussilago farfara growing on coal ash and found greater reproductive effort of T.
Three more herbs that increase ciliary transport of mucus are Tussilago farfara (coltsfoot), Fructus foeniculi (fennel), and Fructus anisi (anise) (3) Coltsfoot is a common respiratory herb.
In 1992 the Commonwealth Drugs and Poisons Scheduling Standing Committee (now National Drugs and Poisons Schedule Committee) scheduled a number of herbs containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids, restricting the use of such herbs as Borago off, Pulmonaria spp, Senecio spp, Tussilago farfara and Symphytum off (which, based on lack of scientific evidence, was later rescheduled to allow its use topically).