tussock moth

(redirected from Tussock moths)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

tussock moth

n.
Any of various usually dull-colored moths of the family Lymantriidae, the caterpillars of which have tufts of hair along the back and are often destructive to deciduous trees.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tussock moth

n
(Animals) any of various pale or dull-coloured moths of the family Lymantriidae (or Laparidae), the hairy caterpillars of which are pests of many trees. See also gipsy moth, browntail moth, goldtail moth
[C19: so named because of the tufts of hair on the caterpillars]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tussock moth - dull-colored moth whose larvae have tufts of hair on the body and feed on the leaves of many deciduous treestussock moth - dull-colored moth whose larvae have tufts of hair on the body and feed on the leaves of many deciduous trees
moth - typically crepuscular or nocturnal insect having a stout body and feathery or hairlike antennae
gipsy moth, gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar - European moth introduced into North America; a serious pest of shade trees
browntail, brown-tail moth, Euproctis phaeorrhoea - small brown and white European moth introduced into eastern United States; pest of various shade and fruit trees
Euproctis chrysorrhoea, gold-tail moth - white furry-bodied European moth with a yellow tail tuft
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(lepidoptera: lymantriinae) tussock moths of biosecurity concern., Editor: Simon Joly, Montreal Botanical Garden, Canada, 5(12): e14280
One study found that ants killed 85% of the tussock moths that attacked Douglas fir, and there are many other examples of how ants protect trees from tree predators.
This is followed by nine families of moths (Lepidoptera), including the species-rich owlet moths or Noctuidae (now considered to include the once separate families of tiger and tussock moths) and finally, but by no means least, some 12 families of true flies or Diptera.
In another experiment, Barber offered milkweed tussock moths to 10 bats.
"The tussock moths and nature win in this one;' he says.
Impacts of defoliation by tussock moths (Orgyia vetusta) on the growth and reproduction of bush lupine (Lupinus arboreus).
Four Oregon national forests--the Malheur, Umatilla, Wallowa-Whitman, and Ochoco--and adjacent privately owned forestlands are reeling from a combined invasion of somewhere between three and 6.5 million acres by western spruce budworms, tussock moths, pine bark beetles, root diseases, and nutrient-sapping mistletoes.