tussock moth

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tussock moth

n.
Any of various usually dull-colored moths of the family Lymantriidae, the caterpillars of which have tufts of hair along the back and are often destructive to deciduous trees.

tussock moth

n
(Animals) any of various pale or dull-coloured moths of the family Lymantriidae (or Laparidae), the hairy caterpillars of which are pests of many trees. See also gipsy moth, browntail moth, goldtail moth
[C19: so named because of the tufts of hair on the caterpillars]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tussock moth - dull-colored moth whose larvae have tufts of hair on the body and feed on the leaves of many deciduous treestussock moth - dull-colored moth whose larvae have tufts of hair on the body and feed on the leaves of many deciduous trees
moth - typically crepuscular or nocturnal insect having a stout body and feathery or hairlike antennae
gipsy moth, gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar - European moth introduced into North America; a serious pest of shade trees
browntail, brown-tail moth, Euproctis phaeorrhoea - small brown and white European moth introduced into eastern United States; pest of various shade and fruit trees
Euproctis chrysorrhoea, gold-tail moth - white furry-bodied European moth with a yellow tail tuft
References in periodicals archive ?
Time from exposure to onset of rash is likely minutes to hours, similar to the onset time reported after exposure to other species of tussock moths.
One study found that ants killed 85% of the tussock moths that attacked Douglas fir, and there are many other examples of how ants protect trees from tree predators.
In another experiment, Barber offered milkweed tussock moths to 10 bats.
Like all tussock moths, gypsy moth caterpillars have distinct hair tufts on their bodies.
The tussock moths and nature win in this one;' he says.
But a self-evident fact should not be forgotten: gypsy moths, Douglas fir tussock moths, and juniper bagworms alike have managed to disperse themselves over most or all of the ranges of their hosts, and for all three species ballooning is their only effective mode of dispersal beyond larval crawling distances.
Impacts of defoliation by tussock moths (Orgyia vetusta) on the growth and reproduction of bush lupine (Lupinus arboreus).