Tuum

Tu´um


n.1.Lit., thine; that which is thine; - used in meum and tuum. See 2d Meum.
References in classic literature ?
Some brought a few land-otter and sea-otter skins to barter, but in very scanty parcels; the greater number came prying about to gratify their curiosity, for they are said to be impertinently inquisitive; while not a few came with no other design than to pilfer; the laws of meum and tuum being but slightly respected among them.
That the usurer breaketh the first law, that was made for mankind after the fall, which was, in sudore vultus tui comedes panem tuum; not, in sudore vultus alieni.
This friend was the gamekeeper, a fellow of a loose kind of disposition, and who was thought not to entertain much stricter notions concerning the difference of meum and tuum than the young gentleman himself.
Thus, one still reads in France, above the wicket of the prison in the seignorial mansion of Tourville, Sileto et spera ; in Ireland, beneath the armorial bearings which surmount the grand door to Fortescue Castle, Forte scutum, salus ducum ; in England, over the principal entrance to the hospitable mansion of the Earls Cowper: Tuum est .
Thoughtless and self-indulgent, and unrestrained by a master who found it easier to indulge than to regulate, he had fallen into an absolute confusion as to meum tuum with regard to himself and his master, which sometimes troubled even St.
David will be joining a group from Portadown to work in the village of Tuum, where other volunteers from Northern Ireland are involved in rebuilding work.
One segment reads, ~et factum est tunc nomen tuum in compaginatione extensionis quod appellatum superius celum, inferius vocatum est terra.' This clearly has to do with the creation of heaven and earth.