plane geometry

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plane geometry

n.
The geometry of planar figures.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

plane geometry

n
(Mathematics) the study of the properties of and relationships between plane curves, figures, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

plane′ geom′etry


n.
the geometry of figures whose parts all lie in one plane.
[1740–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

plane geometry

The mathematical study of geometric figures whose parts lie in the same plane, such as polygons, circles, and lines.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.plane geometry - the geometry of 2-dimensional figuresplane geometry - the geometry of 2-dimensional figures
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
geometry - the pure mathematics of points and lines and curves and surfaces
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

plane geometry

n (Math) → Planimetrie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
In principle, the authors state that their method for manufacturing MPCs, which involves screen printing and microfluidic patterning, can accommodate any two-dimensional geometry, as well as different thicknesses and electrical properties, depending on the concentrations of the liquid metal inks to be sprayed.
In three slender volumes, Cannon presents a very personal excursion through the mathematics of one-dimensional and two-dimensional geometry that he has found most meaningful and magical.
For a two-dimensional geometry we need two NURBS basis functions like:

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