game theory

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Related to Two-person zero-sum game: Constant sum game

game theory

n.
A mathematical method of decision-making in which a competitive situation is analyzed to determine the optimal course of action for an interested party, often used in political, economic, and military planning. Also called theory of games.

game theory

n
(Mathematics) mathematical theory concerned with the optimum choice of strategy in situations involving a conflict of interest. Also called: theory of games
ˌgame-ˌtheoˈretic adj

game′ the`ory


n.
a mathematical theory that deals with strategies for maximizing gains and minimizing losses within prescribed constraints.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.game theory - (economics) a theory of competition stated in terms of gains and losses among opposing players
zero-sum game - a game in which the total of all the gains and losses is zero
scientific theory - a theory that explains scientific observations; "scientific theories must be falsifiable"
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
Nash equilibrium - (game theory) a stable state of a system that involves several interacting participants in which no participant can gain by a change of strategy as long as all the other participants remain unchanged
Translations
teoria dels jocs
teorie her
spilteori
Spieltheorie
ludoteorio
teoría de juegos
peliteoria
théorie des jeux
játékelmélet
teori permainan
leikjafræði
teoria dei giochi
žaidimų teorija
speltheorie
spillteori
teoria gier
teoria dos jogos
teoria jocului
teória hier
spelteori
oyun kuramı
lý thuyết trò chơi

game theory

n (in business studies) → Spieltheorie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Major discussion in that paper is the equilibrium point or Nash Equilibrium (NE) in a two-person zero-sum game.
A basic problem with the two-person zero-sum game is that it is incapable of describing interesting or realistic social encounters.
Other chapters include the definition of a "game," two-person zero-sum games, linear programing, infinite games, multistage games, games with incomplete information, utility theory, two-person general-sum games, two-person cooperative games, n-person games, stable sets, indices of power, the bargaining set and related concepts, nonatomic games, games without side payments, and spatial games.