Tyndall effect

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Tyndall effect

(ˈtɪndəl)
n
(General Physics) the phenomenon in which light is scattered by particles of matter in its path. It enables a beam of light to become visible by illuminating dust particles, etc
[C19: named after John Tyndall (1820–93), Irish physicist]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tyndall effect - the phenomenon in which light is scattered by very small particles in its pathTyndall effect - the phenomenon in which light is scattered by very small particles in its path; it makes a beam of light visible; the scattered light is mainly blue
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
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