Tyndareus


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Related to Tyndareus: Clytemnestra, Calchas, Thyestes

Tyn·dar·e·us

 (tĭn-dâr′ē-əs)
n. Greek Mythology
A king of Sparta and the husband of Leda.

Tyndareus

(tɪnˈdærɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a Spartan king; the husband of Leda
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References in classic literature ?
Fragment #67 -- Scholiast on Euripides, Orestes 249: Steischorus says that while sacrificing to the gods Tyndareus forgot Aphrodite and that the goddess was angry and made his daughters twice and thrice wed and deserters of their husbands.
And he came to Tyndareus' bright city for the sake of the Argive maid who had the beauty of golden Aphrodite, and the sparkling eyes of the Graces; and the dark-faced daughter of Ocean, very lovely of form, bare her when she had shared the embraces of Zeus and the king Tyndareus in the bright palace.
And truly Castor and strong Polydeuces would have made him (43) their brother perforce, but Agamemnon, being son-in-law to Tyndareus, wooed her for his brother Menelaus.
but there was no deceitful dealing in the sons of Tyndareus.
Both of them kept sending messages to Lacedaemon, to the house of wise Tyndareus, Oebalus' son, and they offered many bridal-gifts, for great was the girl's renown, brazen.
He sent no one to woo her in his place, but came himself in his black ship of many thwarts over the Ogylian sea across the dark wave to the home of wise Tyndareus, to see Argive Helen and that no one else should bring back for him the girl whose renown spread all over the holy earth.
How far otherwise was the wickedness of the daughter of Tyndareus who killed her lawful husband; her song shall be hateful among men, for she has brought disgrace on all womankind even on the good ones.
The primary binary opposition falls on the protagonists: bolt-hurling Zeus, the lord of the sky, and, in contrast, Leda, wife of Tyndareus of Sparta.
15) Ovid's version does mention Oebalus, but when Ovid calls Hyacinth a "Son of Oebalus" this merely signifies Hyacinth was a Spartan as Oebalus was the famous king of Sparta who fathered Tyndareus, Icarius, and Hippocoon.
In contrast to Homer, who calls Helen Zeus's daughter, Vergil's Aeneas brings Helen, as the daughter of Tyndareus, down to mortal level, where she can be held more accountable.
According to some tales, Leda had two mortal children with her husband King Tyndareus and two immortal children with the Greek god Zeus (Jove), who came to her in the form of a swan.
Hence, as Saville accurately points out, the translation attributes agency to a figure who is traditionally associated with passivity: "Avoiding representations of Leda as the unsuspecting wife of Tyndareus whose secluded bathing spot is slyly invaded by the disguised Zeus, Bradley and Cooper choose an image of thorough self-possession.