Tyndareus


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Related to Tyndareus: Clytemnestra, Calchas, Thyestes

Tyn·dar·e·us

 (tĭn-dâr′ē-əs)
n. Greek Mythology
A king of Sparta and the husband of Leda.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Tyndareus

(tɪnˈdærɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a Spartan king; the husband of Leda
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in classic literature ?
Fragment #67 -- Scholiast on Euripides, Orestes 249: Steischorus says that while sacrificing to the gods Tyndareus forgot Aphrodite and that the goddess was angry and made his daughters twice and thrice wed and deserters of their husbands....
And he came to Tyndareus' bright city for the sake of the Argive maid who had the beauty of golden Aphrodite, and the sparkling eyes of the Graces; and the dark-faced daughter of Ocean, very lovely of form, bare her when she had shared the embraces of Zeus and the king Tyndareus in the bright palace....
And truly Castor and strong Polydeuces would have made him (43) their brother perforce, but Agamemnon, being son-in-law to Tyndareus, wooed her for his brother Menelaus.
20) ...but there was no deceitful dealing in the sons of Tyndareus.
Both of them kept sending messages to Lacedaemon, to the house of wise Tyndareus, Oebalus' son, and they offered many bridal-gifts, for great was the girl's renown, brazen....
He sent no one to woo her in his place, but came himself in his black ship of many thwarts over the Ogylian sea across the dark wave to the home of wise Tyndareus, to see Argive Helen and that no one else should bring back for him the girl whose renown spread all over the holy earth.
How far otherwise was the wickedness of the daughter of Tyndareus who killed her lawful husband; her song shall be hateful among men, for she has brought disgrace on all womankind even on the good ones."
Of the twin Dioscuri, the mortal Castor is the son of the Spartan king Tyndareus, and Pollux is the immortal son of the Greek god Zeus.
That event had huge consequences, according to classical mythology: Leda's intercourse with the swan and then with her husband, King Tyndareus, resulted in two eggs, from which hatched Helen, Clytemnestra and the twins Castor and Pollux.
However, neither Menelaus nor their grandfather Tyndareus will help him.
As we know from the messenger's tale (866-956), the herald, Talthybius, praises the late king Agamemnon and yet duplicitously winks at the partisans of Aegisthus, while the demagogue's argument, which finally persuades the mob to condemn the matricides, is suggested to him by Clytemnestra's father, Tyndareus. Orestes and Electra are sentenced to death, and Orestes's peroration in front of the assembly cannot change the verdict, although he convinces the Argives to allow them to commit suicide instead of being stoned (the prospected punishment for their crime, as Electra anticipated at 50).
(214) The primary binary opposition falls on the protagonists: bolt-hurling Zeus, the lord of the sky, and, in contrast, Leda, wife of Tyndareus of Sparta.