type A

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Related to Type As: Type B personality

type A

or Type A
adj.
Of or relating to a personality or behavior pattern that is marked by tenseness, impatience, and aggressiveness and is thought to be associated with an increased risk factor for heart disease.
n.
A person who has this personality or exhibits this behavior pattern.

Type A


n.
a personality type characterized by competitiveness, perfectionism, and a sense of urgency, believed to be associated with susceptibility to heart attack.
[1970–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Type A - the blood group whose red cells carry the A antigentype A - the blood group whose red cells carry the A antigen
blood group, blood type - human blood cells (usually just the red blood cells) that have the same antigens
References in periodicals archive ?
Upon classifying the AS, it was identified that most AS within the topology of Lithuanian Internet network belong to the Customer type (81%), while there are only 12 (19%) of the Transit type AS (Table 1), which can be explained by the internal economical and network arrangement relating peculiarities of the ISP.
When describing the hierarchical structure of the Lithuanian Internet network, the Customer type AS identified as most spread (81%).
Since this appears to be the initial study investigating personality type as measured by the MBTI and smoking, it is consistent with the nature of exploratory studies to investigate the selected variables with a broader, more general approach.
But over the next 13 years, the 160 surviving Type As were only 58 percent as likely to die of another heart attack as the 71 surviving Type Bs.
Type As may also pay closer attention to telltale cardiac symptoms and seek medical care earlier than Type Bs, they say.
The high Type As reported significantly more physical symptoms associated with stress than their low-scoring counterparts, says Eagleston.
Alhtough adult Type As tend not to report high levels of anxiety or depression, "something different appears to be going on with Type A kids," says Kirmil-Gray.