type B

(redirected from Type Bs)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical.

type B

or Type B
adj.
Of or relating to a behavior pattern that is marked by a relaxed manner, patience, and friendliness and is thought to be associated with a decreased risk of heart disease.
n.
A person who has this personality or exhibits this behavior pattern.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Type B


n.
a personality type characterized by amiability, tolerance of imperfection, and an unhurried manner, believed to be associated with decreased risk of heart attack.
[1970–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Type B - the blood group whose red cells carry the B antigentype B - the blood group whose red cells carry the B antigen
blood group, blood type - human blood cells (usually just the red blood cells) that have the same antigens
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
She a such people Type Rs (as opposed to Type As or Type Bs).
For Type Bs the biggest factors in weight gain are corn, wheat, buckwheat, lentils, tomatoes, peanuts and sesame seeds.
In a pooling equilibrium where the offered rate is a population-weighted average of the two separating rates, Type Bs would like to borrow more than Type As.
The carbon steel (Type B) and stainless steel (Type BS) nuts install quickly and permanently into aluminum or steel sheets as thin as .040" / 1mm.
Type As, are artistic, well-organised, highly competitive and emotionally stable, while Type Bs tend to be traditional, conservative, disorganised, spontaneous and focused on team-working.
Type Bs can eat meat and dairy while AB blood types can pick from both the A and B diets.
Type Bs can also be quite lovable in a way, rather in the way that a puppy dog can be lovable while observed in the frantic pursuit of his own tail (at least until the thrill of it all gets to much for him, and he winds up making a mess on the carpet).
In spite of the Type A's hard work, the Type Bs are the ones who appear to make it to the top.
The latter result suggests that, among audit professionals, Type A individuals tend to outperform and be more satisfied with their employment than Type Bs.
In general, Type As are more competitive, seek more challenges, and set higher performance standards for themselves than Type Bs. So why have Type As drawn such negative reviews?
Individuals who are relatively lacking in these characteristics are labeled as Type Bs (Chesney, Black, Chadwick, & Rosenman, 1981; Lobel, 1988; Spence, Helmreich & Pred, 1987).