collagen

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col·la·gen

 (kŏl′ə-jən)
n.
1. Any of a class of extracellular proteins that are composed of three coiled polypeptide chains, form strong fibers, and are the main constituents of cartilage, bone, and other connective tissues in animals.
2. Material composed principally of collagen proteins. Collagen is converted into gelatin when boiled in water.

[Greek kolla, glue + -gen.]

col′la·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk), col·lag′e·nous (kə-lăj′ə-nəs) adj.

collagen

(ˈkɒlədʒən)
n
(Biochemistry) a fibrous scleroprotein of connective tissue and bones that is rich in glycine and proline and yields gelatine on boiling
[C19: from Greek kolla glue + -gen]
collagenic, collagenous adj

col•la•gen

(ˈkɒl ə dʒən)

n.
a strongly fibrous protein that is abundant in bone, tendons, cartilage, and connective tissue, yielding gelatin when denatured by boiling.
[1860–65; < Greek kólla glue + -gen]
col•lag•e•nous (kəˈlædʒ ə nəs) adj.

col·la·gen

(kŏl′ə-jən)
The tough, fibrous protein found in bone, cartilage, skin, and other connective tissue. Collagen provides these body structures with the ability to withstand forces that stretch or lengthen them.

collagen

A fibrous protein, the chief protein constituent of connective tissue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
cartilage, gristle - tough elastic tissue; mostly converted to bone in adults
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
albuminoid, scleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eye
Translations
kolagen
collageen

collagen

[ˈkɒlədzən] Ncolágeno m

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollagène m

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollageno

col·la·gen

n. colágeno, principal proteína de sostén del tejido conectivo de la piel, huesos, tendones y cartílagos.

collagen

n colágeno
References in periodicals archive ?
In PR/P staining, a homogeneous mixture of colors characterized by areas of reddish and green-yellow birefringence was initially observed in the polarization of all 24 equine biopsies with Pythiosis, indicating the presence of mature type I collagen (Bright red in polarization) and type III (bright green-yellow in polarization) in equal proportions, with the thinner and less organized type III collagen fibers.
Western blot analysis demonstrated significantly increased expression of type I and type III collagen levels in the urethral fibrosis group as compared to the sham group.
Adams, "Diminished type III collagen promotes myofibroblast differentiation and increases scar deposition in cutaneous wound healing," Cells Tissues Organs, vol.
After repair of the torn tendon, type III collagen appeared in a disordered arrangement and was then gradually replaced by type I collagen.
They are derived from young bovine dermis, one of the richest sources of Type III collagen available.
14,15] Specifically, the alanine to threonine change at position 698 of the [alpha]1(III) chain, as a result of COL3A1 rs1800255, could affect the tensile strength of type III collagen fibres.
Type III collagen is weaker, and synthesis of type III collagen increases during the early phase of repair and remodeling of tendons.
The results show that the type III collagen binding assay can substitute for electrophoretic analysis of VWF multimer distribution as a part of the initial workup of VWD.
6 and 7, under the polarized light microscope, type I collagen fibers appeared red or yellow, type III collagen fibers appeared green.
The test, developed by scientists at the University of Southampton, King's College London and University of Kent at Canterbury, is based on the measurement of two proteins in the blood, insulin-like growth factor-I and the amino terminal pro-peptide of type III collagen.
During initial inflammatory phase erythrocytes and inflammatory cells enter the site of injury and later tenocytes gradually migrate to the wound and Type III collagen synthesis is initiated.
Initially type III collagen appears but by the end of first week collagen type I dominate and it becomes the major collagen of mature scar tissue.