tyrant

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ty·rant

(tī′rənt)
n.
1. An extremely oppressive, unjust, or cruel ruler.
2. An absolute ruler who governs without restrictions, especially one who seized power illegally.
3. An oppressive, harsh, arbitrary person: My boss is a tyrant.

[Middle English, from Old French, alteration (influenced by -ant, present participle ending) of tyran, from Latin tyrannus, from Greek turannos, absolute ruler, despot, possibly from Luwian tarwanis, ruler; see terə-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tyrant

(ˈtaɪrənt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who governs oppressively, unjustly, and arbitrarily; despot
2. any person who exercises authority in a tyrannical manner
3. anything that exercises tyrannical influence
4. (Historical Terms) (esp in ancient Greece) a ruler whose authority lacked the sanction of law or custom; usurper
[C13: from Old French tyrant, from Latin tyrannus, from Greek turannos]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ty•rant

(ˈtaɪ rənt)

n.
1. a sovereign or other ruler who uses power oppressively or unjustly.
2. any person in a position of authority who exercises power oppressively or despotically.
3. a tyrannical or compulsory influence.
4. an absolute ruler, esp. one in ancient Greece or Sicily.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin tyrannus < Greek týrannos]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tyrant

A Greek synonym for king or ruler, not necessarily denoting one who has seized power unconstitutionally or who rules oppressively.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tyrant - a cruel and oppressive dictatortyrant - a cruel and oppressive dictator  
czar - a person having great power
potentate, dictator - a ruler who is unconstrained by law
2.tyrant - in ancient Greece, a ruler who had seized power without legal right to ittyrant - in ancient Greece, a ruler who had seized power without legal right to it
ruler, swayer - a person who rules or commands; "swayer of the universe"
3.tyrant - any person who exercises power in a cruel waytyrant - any person who exercises power in a cruel way; "his father was a tyrant"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tyrant

noun dictator, bully, authoritarian, Big Brother, oppressor, control freak, despot, autocrat, absolutist, martinet, slave-driver, Hitler Since 1804 the country has been mostly ruled by tyrants.
Quotations
"The hand of vengeance found the bed"
"To which the purple tyrant fled;"
"The iron hand crushed the tyrant's head,"
"And became a tyrant in his stead" [William Blake The Grey Monk]
"Tyrants seldom want pretexts" [Edmund Burke letter to a Member of the National Assembly]
"Nature has left this tincture in the blood,"
"That all men would be tyrants if they could" [Daniel Defoe The History of the Kentish Petition]
"When he laughed, respectable senators burst with laughter,"
"And when he cried the little children died in the streets" [W.H. Auden Epitaph on a Tyrant]
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tyrant

noun
1. An absolute ruler, especially one who is harsh and oppressive:
2. One who imposes or favors absolute obedience to authority:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُسْتَبِد، ظالِم، طاغِيَه، جائِر
tyran
tyran
despotakényúrzsarnok
harîstjóri
despotiškai valdytitironastironijatironiškaitironiškai elgtis su
tirāns
tiran
tyrann

tyrant

[ˈtaɪrənt] Ntirano/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tyrant

[ˈtaɪərənt] ntyran m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tyrant

n (lit, fig)Tyrann(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tyrant

[ˈtaɪərnt] ntiranno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

tyrant

(ˈtairənt) noun
a cruel and unjust ruler. The people suffered under foreign tyrants.
tyrannical (tiˈrӕnikəl) adjective , tyrannous (ˈtirənəs)
of or like a tyrant. a tyrannical ruler; His actions were tyrannous.
tyˈrannically, ˈtyrannously adverb
tyrannize, tyrannise (ˈti-) verb
to rule or treat (a person or people) cruelly and unjustly. He tyrannizes his family.
ˈtyranny (ˈti-) noun
an action, or the method of ruling, of a tyrant. People will always resist tyranny.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his magisterial study of early Greek myths Timothy Gantz writes, "That the Sphinx did ask riddles of the Thebans is not absolutely certain until the Tyrannos (OT 130-131, 391-94), and not before Asklepiades do we learn what the riddle (quoted in dactylic hexameters) was" (7) He further argues that conclusions from art works depicting the Sphinx and young men "might also suggest a tradition in which there is no riddle, for youths rather than grown men will scarcely have been sent out to try to solve it" (8)
Oresteia in "Klytaimestra Tyrannos. Fear and Tyranny in
(Baudelaire 1982, 173) But he has reversed the poet's meaning: pleasure is not a "ruthless master," it is not a tyrant (think of Plato's Eros tyrannos) or a merciless torturer whipping us and pressing for more.
Ang s c 1,3 ma solo tiranni sed tyrannos et tyrannos 2,4 aveva...formato dolaverat ([s.sup.m]) deleverat 2,6 percioche nam ([s.sup.m]) et iam 17,9 ridiciate referatis om.
Mantovani reproduces the folii 182v-190 of the Latin manuscript 741 at the Biblioteca Universitaria of Bologna, which contains the Declamatio Johannis Garzonis in tyrannos and the Pro Liberiate, originally conceived by Garzoni as private documents in praise of the death of the tyrant who reigned upon Bologna for twenty years: the very same Giovanni II Bentivoglio whom Garzoni actively and opportunistically supported with his authoritative propaganda.
In reading Oedipus Tyrannos, Nie challenges the arguments of "predestination" and "Oedipus complex" and then concludes that it is "an ethical tragedy resulted from the conflict between ethical taboo and Oedipus' intensifying ethical consciousness" (177).
For instance, Vindiciae contra tyrannos (1579) followed the classical pattern of questions and answers, yet inserted religious overtones in answering whether or not to oppose misgoverning rulers by asking 'whether subjects have to obey princes who command them to act against the word of God; whether princes who make such demands can be resisted; whether princes who ruin their states can be resisted; and whether neighbouring princes have a duty to help the subjects of an oppressed people overthrow their prince'.
Pentland's essay further contributes to our understanding of the English reception of continental resistance theory, including the Vindiciae Contra Tyrannos. Adrian Streete's "Conciliarism and Liberty in Shakespeare and Fletcher's Henry VIII' investigates another neglected topic: "the political role of councils and counsellors" in the political thought and practice of both Henry's reign and the Jacobean moment of Shakespeare and Fletcher's play (84).
Caesar's assassination was later also approved by the unknown author of the most influential Huguenot treatise, Vindiciae, contra Tyrannos: "indeed, Brutus, Cassius, Casca, and others who killed Caesar while the affair was still raging, could not be charged" (Vindiciae, contra Tyrannos: Or, Concerning the Legitimate Power of a Prince over the People, and of the People over a Prince.
Alle carte 182v-190v del manoscritto Latino 741 della Biblioteca Universitaria di Bologna, uno dei codici miscellanei che ci tramandano le opere di Giovanni Garzoni, medico e umanista bolognese, agiografo e storico, poligrafo tra i piU versatili e fecondi dell'eta aurea di Giovanni II Bentivoglio, troviamo, tra una composita serie di opere--orazioni, epistole, saggi eruditi e testi agiografici--due scritti, identificati nei cataloghi (Manfre 37) con i titoli di Declamatio in tyrannos e Pro libertate, difficili da contestualizzare e ancora piU da interpretare, se non in via di ipotesi.