Tyrol

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Ty·rol

or Ti·rol  (tə-rōl′, tī-, tī′rōl′)
A region of the eastern Alps in western Austria and northern Italy. Inhabited in ancient times by Celtic peoples, the Tyrol constantly passed back and forth, in whole or in part, between Austria and Italy in the 1800s. Its present division dates from the Treaty of St. Germain in 1919. The Tyrolean Alps are a popular tourist area.

Ty·rol′e·an, Tyr′o·lese′ (tĭr′ə-lēz′, -lēs′, tī′rə-) adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Tyrol

(tɪˈrəʊl; ˈtɪrəʊl; German tiˈroːl) or

Tirol

n
(Placename) a mountainous state of W Austria: passed to the Hapsburgs in 1363; S part transferred to Italy in 1919. Capital: Innsbruck. Pop: 683 317 (2003 est). Area: 12 648 sq km (4883 sq miles)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ty•rol

or Ti•rol

(tɪˈroʊl, taɪ-, ˈtaɪ roʊl; Ger. tiˈroʊl)

n.
an alpine region in W Austria and N Italy: a former Austrian crown land.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tyrol - a picturesque mountainous province of western Austria and northern ItalyTyrol - a picturesque mountainous province of western Austria and northern Italy
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Austria, Oesterreich, Republic of Austria - a mountainous republic in central Europe; under the Habsburgs (1278-1918) Austria maintained control of the Holy Roman Empire and was a leader in European politics until the 19th century
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Tyrol

[tɪˈrəʊl] Nel Tirol
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Tyrol

[tɪˈrəʊl] nTyrol m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Tyrol

n the TyrolTirol nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Tyrol

[tɪˈrəʊl] n the Tyrolil Tirolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Musical groups from the Tyrolian region were generally popular in many European capitals at that time because the people in the Tyrolian area had revolted against Napoleon in 1809, and such people, even though their revolt was unsuccessful, were viewed with respect for at least having tried.
They were the equivalent of an Englishman turning up in Austria wearing a small hat, Tyrolian shorts held by suspenders and carrying a beer mug in one hand and a Wiener Schnitzel in the other.
The story is about a Tyrolian boy who is tempted to move to New York, only to become disillusioned and return to his home and true love.
The Tyrolian capital lies at the cross roads of Europe's most important and historic trade routes less than 20 miles north of Italy via the 4,122 foot-high Brenner Pass and just 10 miles south of Germany's Bavarian border.
We'd just stepped off a gondola lift after a rendezvous in the hotel bar and we were definitely in the market for some more Tyrolian hospitality.
The last two chapters focus on the South Tyrolian collective identity as expressed in literature as well as 'memory acts' and places.
Then she went away to the Tyrolian Alps with her ailing daughter; he traveled to Paris to work.