Etruria

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E·tru·ri·a

 (ĭ-tro͝or′ē-ə)
An ancient country of west-central Italy in present-day Tuscany and parts of Umbria. It was the center of the Etruscan civilization, which spread throughout much of Italy before being supplanted by Rome in the third century bc.

E·tru′ri·an adj. & n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Etruria

(ɪˈtrʊərɪə)
n
1. (Placename) an ancient country of central Italy, between the Rivers Arno and Tiber, roughly corresponding to present-day Tuscany and part of Umbria
2. (Placename) a factory established in Staffordshire by Josiah Wedgwood in 1769
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

E•tru•ri•a

(ɪˈtrʊər i ə)

n.
an ancient country located between the Arno and Tiber rivers, roughly corresponding to modern Tuscany in W Italy.
E•tru′ri•an, adj., n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Etruria - an ancient country in central ItalyEtruria - an ancient country in central Italy; assimilated by the Romans by about 200 BC
Italia, Italian Republic, Italy - a republic in southern Europe on the Italian Peninsula; was the core of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire between the 4th century BC and the 5th century AD
Etruscan - a native or inhabitant of ancient Etruria; the Etruscans influenced the Romans (who had suppressed them by about 200 BC)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
311: Apollonius, following Hesiod, says that Circe came to the island over against Tyrrhenia on the chariot of the Sun.
Miller informs us that the ship's original name was Tyrrhenia, but many disliked it and found it difficult to pronounce, so the vessel was renamed in 1924 (two years after her maiden voyage).