tzadik

(redirected from Tzaddikim)

tzadik

(ˈtsædɪk)
n
(Judaism) a variant spelling of zaddik
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(62) According to one source, "Several tzaddikim wanted to ordain [Asher Yechezkel] as admor, but he wouldn't agree." (63) Asher's wife, Fayge, was descended from some of the closest disciples of the leaders of Lubavitch.
Tzaddikim were often credited with working miraculous cures and other preternatural feats.
Most Jewish Tzaddikim (saintly men, revered rabbis), for example, have often strayed from the straight and narrow.
Now that the text adds the phrase, "all nations who have forgotten God," I infer that there are righteous people (tzaddikim) among gentile nations who indeed merit a portion in the age to come.
time-honored tradition to refer to many biblical figures as tzaddikim
The men who are the tellers of legends, the "Tzaddikim," (the "righteous ones") were charged to instruct how all of humankind could communicate with the Divine, no matter how humble the individual's position.
As Jewish legend would have it, there are thirty-six tzaddikim in the world, thirty-six lamed vov, righteous, just men, upon whom the world depends.
He said, "Know that all of the descents, breakdowns and confusion are required in order to enter the gates of holiness, and all the great tzaddikim went through them ...
Highly recommended reading for their succinct sensitivity and reflective evocations, the thirty-six free verse poems are artfully divided into five theme-oriented sections: Torah & Tellfillah; Tzaddikim; Children; Nature; and Redemption.
(92) The Gra may well have felt that Passover's optimal redemptive potential was squandered by the practices of the tzaddikim and their followers.
(In Hasidism, devotees often follow charismatic leaders, known as tzaddikim.)
For a long time I have known our "gedolim" and "tzaddikim." In their opinion, they are exempt from being concerned with civility, fairness, and honesty, because their intentions are--of course--for the sake of Heaven.