U-boat

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U-boat

(yo͞o′bōt′)
n.
A submarine of the German navy.

[Translation of German U-Boot, short for Unterseeboot : unter, under (from Middle High German under, from Old High German untar; see n̥dher- in Indo-European roots) + See, sea (from Middle High German , from Old High German) + Boot, boat.]

U-boat

n
(Nautical Terms) a German submarine, esp in World Wars I and II
[from German U-Boot, abbreviation for Unterseeboot, literally: undersea boat]

U-boat

(ˈyuˌboʊt)

n.
a German submarine.
[1910–15; < German U-Boot, short for Unterseeboot literally, undersea boat]

U-boat

or “Unterseeboot” A German submarine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.U-boat - a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoesU-boat - a submersible warship usually armed with torpedoes
attack submarine - a military submarine designed and armed to attack enemy shipping
auxiliary research submarine - a submarine for research purposes
conning tower - a raised bridge on a submarine; often used for entering and exiting
escape hatch - hatchway that provides a means of escape in an emergency
fleet ballistic missile submarine - a submarine carrying ballistic missiles
nautilus, nuclear submarine, nuclear-powered submarine - a submarine that is propelled by nuclear power
periscope - an optical instrument that provides a view of an otherwise obstructed field
schnorchel, schnorkel, snorkel breather, breather, snorkel - air passage provided by a retractable device containing intake and exhaust pipes; permits a submarine to stay submerged for extended periods of time
asdic, echo sounder, sonar - a measuring instrument that sends out an acoustic pulse in water and measures distances in terms of the time for the echo of the pulse to return; "sonar is an acronym for sound navigation ranging"; "asdic is an acronym for antisubmarine detection investigation committee"
submersible warship, submersible - a warship designed to operate under water
Translations

U-boat

[ˈjuːbəʊt] Nsubmarino m alemán

U-boat

nU-Boot nt

U-boat

[ˈjuːˌbəʊt] nsottomarino tedesco
References in periodicals archive ?
The U-boats were cramped, smelly, unhygienic and also almost unbearably claustrophobic.
Mr MacNeil's EDM is entitled 'Remembering the Catalina 75th Anniversary' and "remembers the bravery and sacrifice of the Catalina crews which hunted U-boats off the coast to save the lives of merchant seamen bringing food to nations under rations".
Ships leaving the nearby Navy yard are being sunk by enemy U-boats. Could there be spies hiding out at the club?
These goods were transported in thousands of merchant ships, which were vulnerable to attack by German submarines (U-boats).
David Cain, of Harwich Haven History Surrender and Sanctuary, said: "We wanted a landmark and something to stay on the beach, like the U-boats.
The East Coast war channels were the setting for fierce fighting as German U-boats attacked cargo and coal ships, fishing vessels and the Royal navy escorts which sought to protect them.
Shadow Over the Atlantic, the Luftwaffe and the U-Boats: 1943-45
Berube's testimony touches upon protocol for burial at sea, escorting frigates through the Panama Canal and a few of the fearsome encounters his convoys experienced when faced by German U-boats. These confrontations were part of the Battle of the Atlantic, which was the longest continuous battle of the Second World War.
The German U-Boast campaign against American shipping in the waters of Bermuda is an obscure theater of the Second World War which is now told in great detail and comprehensively (not just in terms of geography but also from the perspectives of both Allied and Axis participants) in Eric Wiberg's "U-Boats off Bermuda: Patrol Summaries and Merchant Ship Survivors Landed in Bermuda 1940-1944".
Carrying Swordfish aircraft, the ship saw action on the hazardous Atlantic and Arctic convoy routes, escorting ships and protecting them from attack by German aircraft and U-boats.
The use of submarines, often referred to as U-boats, in World War One to disrupt British trade routes in the English Channel and the North Sea was a key part of German tactics.
According to Mr Dalton, the ships all flew British pennants from the flagstaff, which made them automatic targets for marauding German submarines, or U-boats, and the author said during the war years, no-one knew where or when the deadly underwater machines would strike next, as they covered the waters of the Atlantic, Mediterranean, the North Sea, and the English Channel, among others.