United States Marshals Service

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Noun1.United States Marshals Service - the United States' oldest federal law enforcement agency is responsible today for protecting the Federal Judiciary and transporting federal prisoners and protecting federal witnesses and managing assets seized from criminals and generally ensuring the effective operation of the federal judicial systemUnited States Marshals Service - the United States' oldest federal law enforcement agency is responsible today for protecting the Federal Judiciary and transporting federal prisoners and protecting federal witnesses and managing assets seized from criminals and generally ensuring the effective operation of the federal judicial system
Department of Justice, DoJ, Justice Department, Justice - the United States federal department responsible for enforcing federal laws (including the enforcement of all civil rights legislation); created in 1870
law enforcement agency - an agency responsible for insuring obedience to the laws
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the moment he pins his father's bloodied star on his chest, Sheriff Simms fulfills his calling, hunts his father's killer, and eludes the U.S. marshal with his fallen-away Mormon deputies who hunt the sheriff for the bounty on his head levied because he maintains two families.
The unnamed federal agent is the first deputy U.S. marshal to be killed in the line of duty in Tucson in 66 years.
''I'm confident in our team up here,'' U.S. Marshal Charles F.
In the back from the left are Bob Young, Carlton Fields; Tom Figmik, chief deputy U.S. marshal, U.S.
The Senate confirmed his nominee for U.S. Marshal in the Minnesota district, Sharon Lubinski, making her the first lesbian U.S.
Representatives from the U.S. Marshal's Service, the Fort Smith Convention and Visitors Bureau, and the city's department of economic development gave a presentation on the decision to establish the U.S.
It depicts a U.S. marshal escorting an African-American girl to school during the fractious era of desegregation in America.
The U.S. marshal for New Jersey claimed that "no religious service" occurred during the fugitive programs and that officials were seeking to use church facilities and "their networking."
John Bromfield, known for his roles in the 1950s series "The Sheriff of Cochise" and "U.S. Marshal," died Sept.
Last month a deputy U.S. marshal was charged with murder.
The U.S. Marshal Service was created by the first Congress in the Judiciary Act of 1789.