National Institutes of Health

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Related to U.S. National Institutes of Health: National Cancer Institute
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Noun1.National Institutes of Health - an agency in the Department of Health and Human Services whose mission is to employ science in the pursuit of knowledge to improve human healthNational Institutes of Health - an agency in the Department of Health and Human Services whose mission is to employ science in the pursuit of knowledge to improve human health; is the principal biomedical research agency of the federal government
Department of Health and Human Services, Health and Human Services, HHS - the United States federal department that administers all federal programs dealing with health and welfare; created in 1979
bureau, federal agency, government agency, agency, office, authority - an administrative unit of government; "the Central Intelligence Agency"; "the Census Bureau"; "Office of Management and Budget"; "Tennessee Valley Authority"
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References in periodicals archive ?
ISLAMABAD -- The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson and Johnson announced Monday a plan to carry out an HIV vaccine efficacy trial in North America, South America and Europe.
The clinical trial was sponsored by The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, part of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The study took place from November 2014 through December 2015 and was a multi-center, randomized, open-label study that enrolled 179 participants between the ages of 18 to 55 with either symptoms of uncomplicated urogenital gonorrhea, untreated urogenital gonorrhea or sexual contact with someone with gonorrhea within 14 days before enrollment.
The U.S. National Institutes of Health is sponsoring the study.
Pluristem's development plan for the PLXRAD cells considers numerous potential clinical indications such as: enhancement of engraftment of transplanted hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of bone marrow deficiency, which can result from immune system disorders, genetic diseases, and treatment of leukemia and other blood cancers; treatment of bone marrow deficiency in patients who have undergone chemotherapy; treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in conjunction with the U.S. National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Pluristem's development plan for the PLX RAD cells considers numerous potential clinical indications such as: enhancement of engraftment of trans planted hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of bone marrow deficiency, which can result from immune system disorders, genetic diseases, and treatment of leukemia and other blood cancers; treatment of bone marrow deficiency in patients who have undergone chemotherapy; treatment of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) in conjunction with the U.S. National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Scientists from the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the University of Oxford in England found that almost 80 percent of white men carry a variant form of this gene, which increased risk of testicular cancer up to threefold in the study.
The grants were announced by the two funding organizations, the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Wellcome Trust, a global charity based in London.
The next year, the U.S. National Institutes of Health issued formal guidelines on recombining genetic materials.
Disclosures: Funding was provided by multiple sources, including the U.S. National Institutes of Health; the U.S.
The reagent, developed by the team of Yasuteru Urano, a chemical biology professor at the University of Tokyo, and Hisataka Kobayashi, chief scientist at the U.S. National Institutes of Health, can highlight carcinoma that is smaller than 1 millimeter in size which magnetic resonance imaging and other existing tools cannot detect.
The Phase II trial was primarily funded by a USD3m (EUR2.3m) grant from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH).
In an article published in the current Journal of Immunology, the experts from Hong Kong and the U.S. National Institutes of Health described how they inserted five key components of the H5N1 virus into the vaccinia vaccine.

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