space shuttle

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space shuttle
space shuttle Discovery landing at Kennedy Space Center in Florida in March 2009

space shuttle

n.
A reusable spacecraft with wings for controlled descent in the atmosphere, designed to transport astronauts between Earth and an orbiting space station and also used to deploy and retrieve satellites.

space shuttle

n
(Astronautics) any of a series of reusable US space vehicles (Columbia (exploded 2003), Challenger (exploded 1986), Discovery, Atlantis, Endeavour) that can be launched into earth orbit transporting astronauts and equipment for a period of observation, research, etc, before re-entry and an unpowered landing on a runway. The first operational flight took place in 1981 and it was taken out of service in 2011

space′ shut`tle


(often caps.)
a reusable spacecraft, or orbiter, with two solid rocket boosters and an external fuel tank that are jettisoned after takeoff.
[1965–70, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.space shuttle - a reusable spacecraft with wings for a controlled descent through the Earth's atmospherespace shuttle - a reusable spacecraft with wings for a controlled descent through the Earth's atmosphere
ballistic capsule, space vehicle, spacecraft - a craft capable of traveling in outer space; technically, a satellite around the sun
Translations
совалка
avaruussukkula
ûrrepülõgépűrrepülőgépûrsiklóűrsikló
geimflaug
vesoljski čolniček

space shuttle

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Patent Office issues a patent for the game Twister 1990: Germany beats Argentina 1-0 in the World Cup final in Rome, having beaten England on penalties in the semi-final 1996: The Spice Girls release their debut single Wannabe in the UK 2000: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is published, breaking all sales records with a print run of 5.3m 2011: Space Shuttle Atlantis is launched in the final mission of the U.S. Space Shuttle programme
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Countdown clocks at the Kennedy Space Center began ticking on Tuesday toward the final flight in the 30-year-old U.S. space shuttle program, a cargo run to the International Space Station.
Astronauts Mike Fincke and Greg Chamitoff floated outside the orbiting outpost's Quest airlock for the fourth and final spacewalk planned during shuttle Endeavour's 16-day mission, the next to last in the U.S. space shuttle program.
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Presenting edited versions of Congressional Record Service publications, a NASA report to Congress on a plan for the International Space Station (ISS) National Laboratory, House of Representatives committee hearings on the ISS, and similar sources from 2007-8, this volume examines historical, technical, policy, and funding aspects of the ISS program, the retirement of the U.S. space shuttle program in 2010, and alternative vehicle options for the post-shuttle era.
U.S. space shuttle carrying Japan's Yamazaki returns to Earth
"Today if you are interested in flying, there are only two options, the U.S. Space Shuttle or the Russian Soyuz, and neither of these is available at a reasonable cost or on a regular basis to the general public," Peter Diamandis, chairman and president of the X Prize Foundation in St.
Leaders from around the world sent condolences over the breakup of the U.S. space shuttle Columbia on Saturday, which killed the six Americans and one Israeli aboard.
Now they've got an extra tool--high-definition photos taken by National Aeronautics and Space Administration from aboard the U.S. Space Shuttle orbiter Endeavour.