Supreme Soviet

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Supreme Soviet

n.
The bicameral legislature of the former Soviet Union, with members elected in one house from the population at large and in the other from the constituent national republics.

[Translation of Russian Verkhovnyĭ Sovet.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Supreme Soviet

(in the former Soviet Union) n
1. (Historical Terms) the bicameral legislature, comprising the Soviet of the Union and the Soviet of the Nationalities; officially the highest organ of state power
2. (Historical Terms) a similar legislature in each former Soviet republic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Supreme′ So′viet


n.
(formerly) one of the two principal legislative bodies of the Soviet Union.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Starting in 1941, many nonetheless wrote to various institutions at the federal level (NKVD, USSR Council of Ministers, chairman of the USSR Supreme Soviet), or at the republic or local levels (in the places of settlement or in their regions of origin), to protest decisions they considered to be groundless and to prove that they or their relatives had been wrongfully deported.
"Boys in colonels' epaulettes are pushing the country to dictatorship," he thundered in a nationally televised speech from the floor of the USSR Supreme Soviet, referring to deputies from the hard-line Soyuz group, such as Victor Alksnis, nicknamed "the Black Colonel." A life-long communist and Politburo member, Shevardnadze also resigned from the Communist Party.
The fact is that on December 27th, the Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet, in responding to a similar inquiry from the Poles, stated that they were ready to recognise a provisional Polish government as soon as it was formed.
The Nineteenth Party Conference in 1988 is repeatedly called the Twenty-Ninth; Anastas Mikoyan, rather than Andrei Gromyko, is cited as the chairman of the USSR Supreme Soviet in 1985-88; Geidar Aliyev is termed the first "vice-president," instead of the first deputy prime minister; the chairman of the KGB is described as KGB "president"; Kazakhstan, with a population of only 17 million in a territory the size of India, is termed "populous"; and so forth.
Former chairman of the USSR Supreme Soviet Anatoly Lukyanov, and lifelong Communist Party apparatchik Oleg Shenin, both facing trial for their leading roles in the coup, were overwhelmingly voted onto the re-founded party's 100-member Central Executive Committee (CEC).
All foreigners who wished to become Soviet citizens had to petition either the Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet or the presidium of the supreme soviet of the union republic in which they lived.