Uffizi

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Uffizi

(juːˈfɪtsɪ)
n
(Named Buildings) an art gallery in Florence; built by Giorgio Vasari in the 16th century and opened as a museum in 1765: contains chiefly Italian Renaissance paintings
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Unprecedented loans for this exhibition include the three extraordinary reliquaries (Museo di San Marco, Florence) a magnificent altarpiece of Paradise (Gallerie degli Uffizi, Florence) and the jewel-like Corsini Triptych (Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica in Palazzo Corsini, Rome).
1), while a fourth sheet belonging to Cardinal Leopoldo, which bears Baldinucci's inscribed attribution to Bronzino, is now in the Gabinetto Disegni e Stampe degli Uffizi, Florence (6358 F, cat.
"Il fasto e la ragione: Arte del Settecento a Firenze', Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence, 30 May-30 September (+39 055 2654321).
Like other tourists, Cosimo de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, was impressed by Jacob van Campen's famous Town Hall (hailed as the Eighth Wonder of the World) and purchased Van der Heyden's large Town Hall of Amsterdam with the Dam, 1667 (Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence) as a memento (Fig.
This is one of two large exhibitions under the umbrella of the 'Universal Leonardo', the other being the more wide-ranging La mente di Leonardo: Nel laboratono del Genio Universale in the Uffizi, Florence (28 March 2006-7 January 2007); smaller concurrent shows in Oxford, Milan and Munich examine individual topics or paintings.
The two most famous examples of works that were commissioned in Bruges to be sent to Florence, Memling's Last Judgement, commissioned by Angelo Tani (Narodowe Museum, Gdansk) and Hugo van der Goes's Portinari altarpiece (Uffizi, Florence) are discussed extensively in terms of patronal ambitions and intentions.
1525-26, (8) to which the head of the Virgin closely corresponds, and the later, more complex and convoluted Madonna and Child with St John the Baptist (Uffizi, Florence, Fig.