Ujiji


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Ujiji

(uːˈdʒiːdʒɪ)
n
(Placename) a town in W Tanzania, on Lake Tanganyika: a former slave and ivory centre; the place where Stanley found Livingstone in 1871. It merged with the neighbouring town of Kigoma to form Kigoma-Ujiji in the 1960s
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1871: Henry Morton Stanley, sent to Africa by his newspaper to find Scottish missionary David Livingstone, finally made contact with him at Ujiji on Lake Tanganyika with the words: ''Dr Livingstone, I presume.
sent t 1871: Denbigh-born Henry Morton Stanley, to Africa by his American newspaper to find Scottish missionary David Livingstone, finally made contact with him at Ujiji on Lake Tanganyika with the words: "Dr Livingstone, I presume.
Henry Morton Stanley 1871 Henry Morton Stanley, sent to Africa by his newspaper to find Scottish missionary David Livingstone, finally made contact with him at Ujiji on Lake Tanganyika with the words: "Dr Livingstone, I presume.
Upon discovering Livingstone in the town of Ujiji, Tanzania, Stanley greeted him with the now-famous words, 'Dr Livingstone, I presume?
Arranged geographically in file cabinets, these stereographs show details of life in various parts of the continent, such as the court in session in a courtroom filled with officials, audience, and witnesses pictured in A Native Court in Ujiji, Tanganyika Territory, Africa (P&P stereo.
vvb c Ujiji (1939, Umidwar - Theresina, by Diophon).
Which famous meeting took place at Ujiji in Stacey Solomon - see Question 9 quantum theory in 1900?
Sex alerts Ujiji felines," said I, "as senile Fiji just relaxes
In October 1871 he was given hope the Scottish doctor was alive - a white man matching his description had arrived at Ujiji, now in Tanzania.
The main clay is dark yellow in colour and has no other name except uro; nchara, the red clay is mainly used for colouring and ujiji serves as grog.
David Livingstone, the Scottish missionary-explorer who crusaded against the slave trade, established his last mission at Ujiji, where he was "found" by Henry Morton Stanley, an American journalist-explorer, who had been commissioned by the New York Herald to locate him.
There he took a train to Ujiji and after crossing Lake Tanganyika, he hired a native guide called Kpveke-vo and started the journey through the Belgian Congo on foot.