Till Eulenspiegel

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Till Eulenspiegel

(ˈtɪl ˈɔɪlənˌʃpiːɡəl)
n
(European Myth & Legend) ?14th century, legendary German peasant, whose pranks became the subject of many tales
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
(51.) Ein kurtzweilig Lesen von Dyl Ulenspiegel (Strassburg: Johannes Gruninger, 1515).
Amichai routinely conflates biographical details from different times into one poetic framework, and exploits drafts and poetic ideas that were recorded in different periods for a poem that would be written years later (incidentally, "We read Ulenspiegel" in "We loved here" is not related to the reading of German folklore as Nili Gold writes, but rather to the book Thyl Ulenspiegel by the Belgian author Charles De Coster that appeared in Hebrew translation by Shlonsky in 1949), Also "In the public garden" is not a poem on the love of Ruth and Yehuda, despite the details that Gold identifies as biographical.
BERND ULRICH HUCKER discusses the connections between the different traditions of the tomb inscriptions and the burial of the historically ambivalent court jester Thyl Ulenspiegel (+ 1350 in Molln, North Germany).
Oddly enough, our liberal intellectuals generally so squeamish about mentions of god and the devil, to my knowledge, never questioned Gunter Grass's use of the tin drummer (to my mind a sort of Tyl Ulenspiegel character), who permanently remains three years old, and is the off-stage conceit that holds The Tin Drum together.
The breathtaking bawdiness, violence, and sheer length of the fully scripted quack episodes of some Easter Play scripts undermine Davidson's dismissal of the unintentional pitched battle between the actress and four actors playing Christ, the angel and the three Marys in the village Easter Play recorded in Dyl Ulenspiegel's fictional 'thirteenth history'.
Second, he analyses Flaubert's Salammbo and Tolstoy's War and Peace to establish hallmarks of the historical novel for which there are analogies in Wallenstein, and he also briefly compares it with de Coster's Thyl Ulenspiegel. Third, he examines Wallenstein in the context of Doblin's later statements on it, and of his other works.
Being unfamiliar with the Roman `u' at that time, I went about calling it `I, Klav-divs', but if this was derided I didn't notice, for Graves had me hooked, and I still rate Claudius as one of the four best historical novels I have ever read (Scott always excepted), the three others being Captain Blood, Kenneth Roberts' Northwest Passage, and de Coster's Legend of Ulenspiegel.