Ulster


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Related to Ulster: Ulster Scots

Ul·ster

 (ŭl′stər)
A historical region and ancient kingdom of northern Ireland. Largely annexed by the English Crown during the reign of James I, it is now divided between Ireland and Northern Ireland, which is often called Ulster.

ul·ster

 (ŭl′stər)
n.
A loose, long overcoat made of heavy, rugged fabric and often belted.

[After Ulster.]

Ulster

(ˈʌlstə)
n
1. (Placename) a province and former kingdom of N Ireland: passed to the English Crown in 1461; confiscated land given to English and Scottish Protestant settlers in the 17th century, giving rise to serious long-term conflict; partitioned in 1921, six counties forming Northern Ireland and three counties joining the Republic of Ireland. Pop (three Ulster counties of the Republic of Ireland): 46 714 (2002); (six Ulster counties of Northern Ireland): 1 702 628 (2003 est). Area (Republic of Ireland): 8013 sq km (3094 sq miles); (Northern Ireland): 14 121 sq km (5452 sq miles)
2. (Placename) an informal name for Northern Ireland

ulster

(ˈʌlstə)
n
(Clothing & Fashion) a man's heavy double-breasted overcoat with a belt or half-belt at the back
[C19: so called because it was first produced in Northern Ireland]

Ul•ster

(ˈʌl stər)

n.
1. a former province in Ireland, now comprising Northern Ireland and a part of the Republic of Ireland.
2. a province in N Republic of Ireland. 235,641; 3123 sq. mi. (8090 sq. km).
4. (l.c.) a long, loose, heavy overcoat, orig. of Irish frieze, now also of any of various other woolen cloths.
Ul′ster•ite`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ulster - a historic division of Ireland located in the northeastern part of the islandUlster - a historic division of Ireland located in the northeastern part of the island; six of Ulster's nine counties are in Northern Ireland
2.Ulster - loose long overcoat of heavy fabriculster - loose long overcoat of heavy fabric; usually belted
greatcoat, overcoat, topcoat - a heavy coat worn over clothes in winter
Translations
Severní Irsko
Ulster
Ulster
Ulster
アルスター
얼스터
Ulster
จังหวัดหนึ่งของไอร์แลนด์เหนือ
tỉnh Ulster

Ulster

[ˈʌlstəʳ] NUlster m

Ulster

[ˈʌlstər] nUlster mUlster Defence Association n organisation paramilitaire protestante en Irlande du NordUlster Defence Regiment n section de l'armée britannique en Irlande du NordUlster Volunteer Force n organisation paramilitaire protestante en Irlande du Nord

Ulster

nUlster nt

ulster

n (dated: = coat) → Ulster m

Ulster

[ˈʌlstəʳ] nl'Ulster m

Ulster

أُولْسَتْر Severní Irsko Ulster Ulster Όλστερ Ulster Ulster Ulster Ulster Ulster アルスター 얼스터 Ulster Ulster Ulster Ulster Ольстер Ulster จังหวัดหนึ่งของไอร์แลนด์เหนือ Kuzey İrlanda tỉnh Ulster 阿尔斯特
References in classic literature ?
He was dressed in a suit of English tweed, with an ulster on his arm, and a valise in his hand.
The messenger replied that he knew of a much finer bull called Donn Chuailgne, or Brown Bull of Cooley, which belonged to Dawra, the chief of Ulster.
At the corner of Grosvenor Square and South Audley Street, a man passed him in the mist, walking very fast and with the collar of his grey ulster turned up.
I've left my ulster in the waiting-room," and hastened off to fetch it.
Da Souza's face was yellower than ever and he wore an ulster buttoned up to his chin.
They gave my bobtail coat to somebody else, and sent me an ulster suitable for a giraffe.
Coulson was still a little pale from the effects of his crossing, and he wore a long, thick ulster to conceal the deficiencies of his attire.
A few stragglers were loitering on the pavement, and one, a tall, thin young man in a long ulster, bent forwards as they came down the steps.
She was wrapped in a long ulster, for the morning was raw; and I could see nothing but her face and a mass of light brown hair escaping from under the seaman's cap on her head.
A dark, thick-set man, wearing a long travelling ulster and a Homburg hat, and carrying in his hand a brown leather dressing-case, across which was painted in black letters the name MR.
Lucille was putting on an ulster and cap to go out on deck.
Her prolonged absence having caused some comment, her father followed her, but learned from her maid that she had only come up to her chamber for an instant, caught up an ulster and bonnet, and hurried down to the passage.