Ulster Scots


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Ulster Scots

n.
1. The people of Scotland who settled in Ulster, or their descendants.
2. The variety of Scots spoken in Ulster. Also called Scotch-Irish, Scots-Irish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Broadcaster Eamonn Mallie has published a 13-page draft document which confirms proposals for Irish and Ulster Scots language commissioners and a central translation unit at Stormont.
The DUP is willing to legislate on the language issue, but only if Ulster Scots speakers are included in any Act, a condition Sinn Fein rejected.
But there is comedy Ulster Scots, superhero sex and a kid named after the late Reverend Ian.
It is worth pointing out that it is a character in The Wild Irish Girl that shows disdain for Ulster Scots.
It will be interesting to see just how seriously the heads of our devolved governments take the existing statutory protection of the UK's other native languages (Gaelic in Scotland, Welsh in Wales and Irish and Ulster Scots in Northern Ireland) by demanding that classes in these languages be offered as an alternative.
Scotch-Irish Merchants in Colonial America is an example of what in Ireland is sometimes called "partitionist history"--that is, it rests upon and reinforces the politically-driven insistence that the history of modern Ireland (and of the Irish overseas) is characterized by permanent and irreconcilable divisions between Ireland's "two [ethno-cultural and religious] traditions"--one Protestant and "British" (or "Scotch-Irish" or sometimes "Ulster Scots"), the other Catholic and "Irish" (or sometimes "Gaelic")--each necessarily embodied, in Ireland itself since 1920, in separate, antagonistic "national" states.
It also emerges, however, that this 'branding' tendency is more central to the activities of some younger Protestant cultural activists who function within the newly conceived 'Ulster Scots' frame of reference.
History is set to be made at Westminster when the House of Commons is addressed for the first time ever in Ulster Scots.
As the 400th anniversary of the official Plantation of Ulster approaches, the University of Ulster and the Institute of Ulster Scots Studies is planning a series of volumes, of which this is one.
The blueprint also carries a pledge to deal with outstanding issues, believed to include protection for the Irish language and promoting the Ulster Scots tongue.