ultraliberalism

ultraliberalism

(ˌʌltrəˈlɪbərəlˌɪzəm)
n
a belief in or support for an extremely liberal political party or doctrine
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In this sense, the SUS represents one of the "slices" of well-being and rights that the anti-capitalist movement (even when its participants do not classify themselves in this way) manages to highlight within the "totality" of "ultraliberalism".
The governing class was not endorsing ultraliberalism and the "ruling class" in the epoch was open minded.
Paradoxically, a major part of the campaign of the socialist candidate was based on the rejection of the Sarkozy's presidency, both as to the form of his office (hyperpresidency, showy presidency) (9) and to its foundations (ultraliberalism).
The West, he continued, is confronted by a "deficit of vital energy" which "cannot be compensated for by shouting anti-globalization, anti-American or anti- Eastern European slogans in the street or by Jacques Chirac's public diatribes against 'Anglo-Saxon ultraliberalism'." (28) This same analysis led a center-left daily, Adevarul, to celebrate the "East Europeans" who, this time, found themselves on the right side of the mirror: "Polish workers and, more generally, those of the East, are known as hard workers and this quality becomes all the more apparent when the latter are stimulated by higher salaries compared to what they receive in their own countries" (29).
Pan-European initiatives are now emerging to coordinate opposition to ultraliberalism and to distil the foundations of an EU wide left platform.
Glyn Morgan, responding to Smith, argues that no "impoverishment" of religious life has been noted in a contemporary democracy such as the US, allegations of "ultraliberalism" notwithstanding, and in fact, Morgan argues, things seem to be moving in opposite direction.
This social-market orientation is important to Michel Barnier, who sees it as a way of counteracting the "ultraliberalism that has done a lot of damage to Europeans in the past fifteen years".
This reasoning is a clear indication of the movement form one extreme situation with heavy interventionism to another end of the pendulum of ultraliberalism in the converging economies.
Staunch opponents of guest worker programs, like Congressman James Sensen-brenner, Jr., the powerful chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, have taken to calling the Senate's proposal "the Kennedy bill," an apparent attempt to brush the bill with Kennedy's ultraliberalism. The switch hasn't gone unnoticed--either by journalists or politicians--and indeed has provided humorous asides to what has become a bitter partisan dispute that might not be resolved before the midterm elections in November.
The common conclusion was that "the rupture of the hegemony of ultraliberalism necessitates credible alternatives pursued by large numbers of individuals" (Ibid.: 12).
One may not rule out that after the experiment with "made in the U.S.A." style ultraliberalism, east Europeans may suddenly, out of defiance, revert to ageless domestic hard-liners.