ultraviolet

(redirected from Ultraviolet Rays)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Ultraviolet Rays: infrared rays

ul·tra·vi·o·let

 (ŭl′trə-vī′ə-lĭt)
adj. Abbr. UV
1. Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between violet visible light and x-rays in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 790 terahertz and 30 petahertz and wavelengths between 380 nanometers and 10 nanometers.
2. Of or relating to a light bulb that emits ultraviolet radiation.
n.
The ultraviolet range of electromagnetic radiation: Sunburns result from radiation in the ultraviolet.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ultraviolet

(ˌʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt)
n
(General Physics) the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; in the range 0.4 × 10–6 and 1 × 10–8 metres
adj
(General Physics) of, relating to, or consisting of radiation lying in the ultraviolet: ultraviolet radiation. Abbreviation: UV
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ul•tra•vi•o•let

(ˌʌl trəˈvaɪ ə lɪt)

adj.
1. pertaining to electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths in the range of approximately 5–400 nm, shorter than visible light but longer than x-rays.
2. pertaining to, producing, or using light having such wavelengths: an ultraviolet lamp. Compare infrared.
n.
3. ultraviolet radiation.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ul·tra·vi·o·let

(ŭl′trə-vī′ə-lĭt)
Adjective
Relating to electromagnetic radiation having wavelengths shorter than those of visible light but longer than those of x-rays. See more at electromagnetic spectrum.
Noun
Ultraviolet light or the ultraviolet part of the spectrum. See Note at infrared.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ultraviolet - radiation lying in the ultraviolet rangeultraviolet - radiation lying in the ultraviolet range; wave lengths shorter than light but longer than X rays
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
sun-ray, sunray - a ray of artificial ultraviolet light from a sunray lamp
Adj.1.ultraviolet - having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-raysultraviolet - having or employing wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; lying outside the visible spectrum at its violet end; "ultraviolet radiation"; "an ultraviolet lamp"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
فَوْق البَنَفْسَجي
ultrafialový
ultraviolet
ultravioletti
ibolyántúli
útfjólublár
ultravioletinis
ultraviolets
ultravioleta
ultrafialový
ultraviolett
mor ötesi

ultraviolet

[ˈʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt]
A. ADJultravioleta inv
B. CPD ultraviolet light Nluz f ultravioleta
ultraviolet radiation Nradiación f ultravioleta
ultraviolet rays NPLrayos mpl ultravioleta
ultraviolet treatment Ntratamiento m de onda ultravioleta
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ultraviolet

[ˌʌltrəˈvaɪələt] adj [rays] → ultraviolet(te); [lamp] → à UV
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ultraviolet

[ˌʌltrəˈvaɪəlɪt] adjultravioletto/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ultraviolet

(altrəˈvaiəlit) adjective
(of light) consisting of rays from the invisible part of the spectrum beyond the purple, that have an effect on the skin, eg causing suntan.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ul·tra·vi·o·let

a. ultravioleta, que se extiende más allá de la zona violeta del espectro;
___ raysrayos ___;
___ therapyterapia de radiación ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

ultraviolet

adj ultravioleta
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In shorts and a T-shirt, such a person can soak up enough ultraviolet rays to produce 12,000 IU of vitamin D within 20 minutes, notes Reinhold Vieth of the University of Toronto.
Site includes statistics and information about ultraviolet rays and sunscreen SPF (sun protection factor): www.cdc.gov/ChooseYourCover/
Sunscreens chemically absorb harmful ultraviolet rays, while sunblocks physically deflect them.
NEW YORK -- Consumer education campaigns have moved from encouraging people to wear sunscreen to explaining the difference between different kinds of ultraviolet rays and the need for protection against each.
The special suits block out harmful ultraviolet rays.
Trendy sunglasses can HARM your eyes if they don't protect against the sun's ultraviolet rays.
CDR Roundup--A shift by consumers from pursuit of the ultimate tan to more attentive sun care and avoidance of harmful ultraviolet rays is prompting a slew of line extensions by major manufacturers, promising more growth for the sun care category.
One possibility is handheld scanners which use ultraviolet rays and lasers.
Tokyo, Japan, Dec 5, 2005 - (JCN) - Olympus will bring to market the U-UVF248, an optical system for microscopes that uses deep ultraviolet rays to provide a resolution of 80nm, on January 25.
The machines rely on (X-rays, ultraviolet rays, gamma rays), using the energy to kill living cells.
Within a few hours of exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays, Mobashery notes, the light-sensitive component falls off.

Full browser ?