Umayyad


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U·may·yad

 (o͞o-mī′ăd) or O·may·yad also Om·mi·ad (ō-mī′ăd)
The first dynasty of Arab caliphs (661-750). Its capital was Damascus, and it is known for its encouragement of the arts and architecture.

Umayyad

(uːˈmaɪjæd)
n
(Biography) a variant spelling of Omayyad
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Umayyad - the first dynasty of Arab caliphs whose capital was DamascusUmayyad - the first dynasty of Arab caliphs whose capital was Damascus
dynasty - a sequence of powerful leaders in the same family
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: New play brings legendary Umayyad era love story to life
Dubai: An Umayyad era story of love, sacrifice and toil of a lover has come to life at the centre stage of Global Village through a grand scale musical production 'Silk Road - The Journey of a Unique Necklace'.
The other gates are named after prominent Islamic cultures, such as the Mamluk and Umayyad Gates.
Among the topics are from the Dome of the Chain to Mihrab Da'ud: the transformation of an Umayyad commemorative site at the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem, an Italian Renaissance gate for the Khan: visual culture in early modern Crimea, a missing royal mosque in Istanbul that Islamized a Catholic space: the Galata New Mosque, Adham Isma'il's Arabesque: the making of a radical Arab painting in Syria, (re)writing the early biography of the Alhambra's Fountain of Lions: new evidence from a neo-Latin poem of 1497, and between Istanbul and Gujarat: descriptions of Mecca in the 16th-century Indian Ocean.
The Khamis Mosque is believed to be the first mosque in Bahrain, built during the era of the Umayyad caliph Umar II.
Monday headed from the Umayyad Square in Damascus towards the New Fairgrounds on theDamascus International Airport highway.
The seized collection contains 17 metal coins from the Greco-Roman era, one from the Umayyad period, two from the Ottoman period, and ten from Mohamed Ali Pasha's reign, as well as coins belonging to foreign countries, as Ahmed Al-Rawi, head of the Central Administration of the Archaeological Units in Egyptian Ports, explained.
That was the year a Muslim general called Tariq bin Ziyad, at the bequest of the Umayyad Caliph Al Walid I, landed on the rock that would thereafter be known as his rock, "Jebel Al Tariq," from which is derived the modern name Gibraltar.
As a collection, the chapters stretch the notion of "late antiquity" both chronologically, by extending from the later Roman empire to Arab scholars at Baghdad during the eleventh century, and geographically, by linking the eastern Mediterranean under Roman rule with the Sasanian empire in Iraq, the Umayyad empire in Syria, Arabs at Medina and Mecca, and finally the Abbasid empire in Iraq and Iran.
These two sources describe the conquest of Hispania from a Muslim point of view with the rhetorical purpose of legitimizing Umayyad control of al-Andalus.
The ruins of Hisham's Palace, built during the Umayyad Empire, stand on 60 hectares in Khirbat al-Mafjar, west of the Jordan Valley and 260 meters below sea level.
The first Arab empire was that of the caliphs from the Umayyad Dynasty, which was founded in Damascus by the relatively rich members of Quraysh, Muhammad's tribe.